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Article: Mergers and acquisitions: On the ages and origins of Singapore English particles

TitleMergers and acquisitions: On the ages and origins of Singapore English particles
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/WENG
Citation
World Englishes, 2007, v. 26 n. 4, p. 446-473 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper presents a comprehensive account of the discourse particles in colloquial Singapore English (SE), considering their etymology in the light of both structure and sociohistory. While the object of many studies, mostly focusing on their meaning and use, and generally recognised as coming from Southern Chinese languages, the establishment of the origins and evolution of SE particles has not before been attempted. The thrust of this paper is thus twofold: (i) it outlines the linguistic ecology of Singapore over the decades and proposes a framework involving three ages in which different languages are recognised as dominant, influencing the feature pool in the evolution of SE, and (ii) it identifies the most likely sources of SE particles, through (a) a systematic comparison of the forms and functions of SE particles with particles from the substrates, including, in particular, their original tone, and (b) recourse to sociohistorical facts to support the linguistic postulation. I suggest that in an early era Bazaar Malay and Hokkien contributed the particles lah, ah and what, and Cantonese in a later age provided lor, hor, leh, meh and ma, inclusive of tone. This argument highlights issues interesting for contact dynamics and new varieties of English. © 2007 The Author. Journal compilation © 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177594
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.548
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.445
References
Errata

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLim, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:37:56Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:37:56Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationWorld Englishes, 2007, v. 26 n. 4, p. 446-473en_US
dc.identifier.issn0883-2919en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177594-
dc.description.abstractThis paper presents a comprehensive account of the discourse particles in colloquial Singapore English (SE), considering their etymology in the light of both structure and sociohistory. While the object of many studies, mostly focusing on their meaning and use, and generally recognised as coming from Southern Chinese languages, the establishment of the origins and evolution of SE particles has not before been attempted. The thrust of this paper is thus twofold: (i) it outlines the linguistic ecology of Singapore over the decades and proposes a framework involving three ages in which different languages are recognised as dominant, influencing the feature pool in the evolution of SE, and (ii) it identifies the most likely sources of SE particles, through (a) a systematic comparison of the forms and functions of SE particles with particles from the substrates, including, in particular, their original tone, and (b) recourse to sociohistorical facts to support the linguistic postulation. I suggest that in an early era Bazaar Malay and Hokkien contributed the particles lah, ah and what, and Cantonese in a later age provided lor, hor, leh, meh and ma, inclusive of tone. This argument highlights issues interesting for contact dynamics and new varieties of English. © 2007 The Author. Journal compilation © 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/WENGen_US
dc.relation.ispartofWorld Englishesen_US
dc.titleMergers and acquisitions: On the ages and origins of Singapore English particlesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLim, L: lisalim@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLim, L=rp01169en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-971X.2007.00522.xen_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-35848947035en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-35848947035&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume26en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage446en_US
dc.identifier.epage473en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1467-971X-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.relation.erratumdoi:10.1111/j.1467-971X.2008.00549.x-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLim, L=22955896300en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike1895454-

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