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Conference Paper: On Alexander Wylie’s Jottings on the Science of the Chinese Arithmetic

TitleOn Alexander Wylie’s Jottings on the Science of the Chinese Arithmetic
Authors
KeywordsAlexander Wylie
Chinese mathematics
Arithmetic
algebra
Issue Date2012
PublisherInternational Congress on Mathematical Education (ICME).
Citation
History and Pedagogy of Mathematics (HPM) Satellite Meeting of International Congress on Mathematical Education (ICME), Daejeon, Korea, 16-20 July 2012. In Proceedings of HPM, 2012, p. 229-237 How to Cite?
AbstractStarting from August of 1852 the British Protestant missionary and sinologist, Alexander Wylie (1815–1887), published in nine instalments an account Jottings on the Science of the Chinese Arithmetic in the newspaper North China Herald. He explained clearly the purpose of his account at the beginning: ‘The object of the following desultory notes, made from time to time, in the course of some researches entered upon, with another purpose in view, is to draw attention to the state of the arithmetical science in China, a subject which has not been so fully explored as it might with advantage, and on which some erroneous statements have been current in modern publications.’ Alexander Wylie is a well-known figure in the last quarter of the Qing Dynasty for his contribution in transmitting Western science into China during the latter half of the 19th century. In mathematics he was known for translating three treatises in collaboration with the Qing mathematician Li Shanlan (1811–1882) — Supplementary Elements of Geometry in 1856 but published in 1865 (believed to be based on the English translation of Book VII to XV of Elements by Henry Billingsley in 1570), Treatise of Algebra in 1859 (based on Elements of Algebra by Agustus De Morgan in 1835) and Analytical Geometry and Differential and Integral Calculus Step by Step in 1859 (based on Elements of Analytical Geometry and of the Differential and Integral Calculus of Elias Loomis in 1850). He was also the author of Compendium of Arithmetic published in 1853. This presentation will discuss the knowledge of Chinese science and mathematics which most European sinologists of the 18th and 19th centuries possessed and the low regard they held it in, but the viewpoint of which was critically examined by Wylie in his account.
DescriptionOral Presentation(Theme 2): R102
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177469

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSiu, MKen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, Y Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-18T05:11:10Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-18T05:11:10Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationHistory and Pedagogy of Mathematics (HPM) Satellite Meeting of International Congress on Mathematical Education (ICME), Daejeon, Korea, 16-20 July 2012. In Proceedings of HPM, 2012, p. 229-237en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177469-
dc.descriptionOral Presentation(Theme 2): R102-
dc.description.abstractStarting from August of 1852 the British Protestant missionary and sinologist, Alexander Wylie (1815–1887), published in nine instalments an account Jottings on the Science of the Chinese Arithmetic in the newspaper North China Herald. He explained clearly the purpose of his account at the beginning: ‘The object of the following desultory notes, made from time to time, in the course of some researches entered upon, with another purpose in view, is to draw attention to the state of the arithmetical science in China, a subject which has not been so fully explored as it might with advantage, and on which some erroneous statements have been current in modern publications.’ Alexander Wylie is a well-known figure in the last quarter of the Qing Dynasty for his contribution in transmitting Western science into China during the latter half of the 19th century. In mathematics he was known for translating three treatises in collaboration with the Qing mathematician Li Shanlan (1811–1882) — Supplementary Elements of Geometry in 1856 but published in 1865 (believed to be based on the English translation of Book VII to XV of Elements by Henry Billingsley in 1570), Treatise of Algebra in 1859 (based on Elements of Algebra by Agustus De Morgan in 1835) and Analytical Geometry and Differential and Integral Calculus Step by Step in 1859 (based on Elements of Analytical Geometry and of the Differential and Integral Calculus of Elias Loomis in 1850). He was also the author of Compendium of Arithmetic published in 1853. This presentation will discuss the knowledge of Chinese science and mathematics which most European sinologists of the 18th and 19th centuries possessed and the low regard they held it in, but the viewpoint of which was critically examined by Wylie in his account.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInternational Congress on Mathematical Education (ICME).-
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of HPM 2012en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectAlexander Wylie-
dc.subjectChinese mathematics-
dc.subjectArithmetic-
dc.subjectalgebra-
dc.titleOn Alexander Wylie’s Jottings on the Science of the Chinese Arithmeticen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailSiu, MK: mathsiu@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros212456en_US
dc.identifier.spage229en_US
dc.identifier.epage237en_US

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