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Article: How accurate are the fusion of Cone-beam CT and 3-D stereophotographic images?

TitleHow accurate are the fusion of Cone-beam CT and 3-D stereophotographic images?
Authors
KeywordsBone
Cone beam computed tomography
Controlled study
Diagnostic accuracy
Diagnostic imaging
Issue Date2012
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
Citation
PLoS ONE, 2012, v. 7 n. 11, article no. e49585 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Cone-beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and stereophotography are two of the latest imaging modalities available for three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of craniofacial structures. However, CBCT provides only limited information on surface texture. This can be overcome by combining the bone images derived from CBCT with 3-D photographs. The objectives of this study were 1) to evaluate the feasibility of integrating 3-D Photos and CBCT images 2) to assess degree of error that may occur during the above processes and 3) to identify facial regions that would be most appropriate for 3-D image registration. Methodology: CBCT scans and stereophotographic images from 29 patients were used for this study. Two 3-D images corresponding to the skin and bone were extracted from the CBCT data. The 3-D photo was superimposed on the CBCT skin image using relatively immobile areas of the face as a reference. 3-D colour maps were used to assess the accuracy of superimposition were distance differences between the CBCT and 3-D photo were recorded as the signed average and the Root Mean Square (RMS) error. Principal Findings: The signed average and RMS of the distance differences between the registered surfaces were -0.018 (±0.129) mm and 0.739 (±0.239) mm respectively. The most errors were found in areas surrounding the lips and the eyes, while minimal errors were noted in the forehead, root of the nose and zygoma. Conclusions: CBCT and 3-D photographic data can be successfully fused with minimal errors. When compared to RMS, the signed average was found to under-represent the registration error. The virtual 3-D composite craniofacial models permit concurrent assessment of bone and soft tissues during diagnosis and treatment planning. © 2012 Jayaratne et al.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177327
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJayaratne, YSNen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcGrath, CPJen_US
dc.contributor.authorZwahlen, RAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-18T05:01:08Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-18T05:01:08Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationPLoS ONE, 2012, v. 7 n. 11, article no. e49585en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177327-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Cone-beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and stereophotography are two of the latest imaging modalities available for three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of craniofacial structures. However, CBCT provides only limited information on surface texture. This can be overcome by combining the bone images derived from CBCT with 3-D photographs. The objectives of this study were 1) to evaluate the feasibility of integrating 3-D Photos and CBCT images 2) to assess degree of error that may occur during the above processes and 3) to identify facial regions that would be most appropriate for 3-D image registration. Methodology: CBCT scans and stereophotographic images from 29 patients were used for this study. Two 3-D images corresponding to the skin and bone were extracted from the CBCT data. The 3-D photo was superimposed on the CBCT skin image using relatively immobile areas of the face as a reference. 3-D colour maps were used to assess the accuracy of superimposition were distance differences between the CBCT and 3-D photo were recorded as the signed average and the Root Mean Square (RMS) error. Principal Findings: The signed average and RMS of the distance differences between the registered surfaces were -0.018 (±0.129) mm and 0.739 (±0.239) mm respectively. The most errors were found in areas surrounding the lips and the eyes, while minimal errors were noted in the forehead, root of the nose and zygoma. Conclusions: CBCT and 3-D photographic data can be successfully fused with minimal errors. When compared to RMS, the signed average was found to under-represent the registration error. The virtual 3-D composite craniofacial models permit concurrent assessment of bone and soft tissues during diagnosis and treatment planning. © 2012 Jayaratne et al.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action-
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONEen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectBone-
dc.subjectCone beam computed tomography-
dc.subjectControlled study-
dc.subjectDiagnostic accuracy-
dc.subjectDiagnostic imaging-
dc.titleHow accurate are the fusion of Cone-beam CT and 3-D stereophotographic images?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailJayaratne, YSN: nalaka2@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailMcGrath, CPJ: mcgrathc@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailZwahlen, RA: zwahlen@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMcGrath, CPJ=rp00037en_US
dc.identifier.authorityZwahlen, RA=rp00055en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0049585-
dc.identifier.pmid23185372-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84869842191-
dc.identifier.hkuros212489en_US
dc.identifier.volume7en_US
dc.identifier.issue11, article no. e49585en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000311333800041-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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