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Conference Paper: Learning the language of cell-cell communication through connexin channels

TitleLearning the language of cell-cell communication through connexin channels
Authors
Issue Date2001
Citation
The 9th International Gap Junction Conference, Honolulu, HI., 4-9 August 2001. In Genome Biology, 2001, v. 2 n. 11, p. 4027.1-4027.5 How to Cite?
AbstractResearchers working in the field of gap junctions, the membrane structures dedicated to direct cell-cell communication, might have felt, at times, as if they are children of a lesser god. The molecular cloning of connexins and their identification as the protein components of gap junctions heralded a new era, but compared to the progress achieved in deciphering other junctional structures, it looked as though cadherin and integrins were sprinting in a fast lane and leaving gap junctions behind. But gap junctions are not simple structures of contact between cells, they are in fact channels formed by the oligomerization of connexins: six connexins make a connexon or hemichannel, and two connexons from adjacent cells align in the extracellular space to make a full intercellular gap junction channel that allows direct communication between cells without using the extracellular space to exchange messages. Compared to classical ion channels, however, studies of intercellular ones have suffered from the lack of clear ionic selectivity and of specific toxins to probe their function. But if these aspects led to a grim mood among researchers, it has disappeared with the discovery that several genetic diseases are linked to mutations in connexin genes. The recent meeting on connexins and gap junctions, attended by the vast majority of people active in the field, confirmed some of the trends that have emerged and that are allowing us to make sense of the complexity of connexin language, and announced some of the new avenues that are beginning to be explored.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176331
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 11.313
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBruzzone, Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:09:54Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:09:54Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 9th International Gap Junction Conference, Honolulu, HI., 4-9 August 2001. In Genome Biology, 2001, v. 2 n. 11, p. 4027.1-4027.5en_US
dc.identifier.issn1465-6906en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176331-
dc.description.abstractResearchers working in the field of gap junctions, the membrane structures dedicated to direct cell-cell communication, might have felt, at times, as if they are children of a lesser god. The molecular cloning of connexins and their identification as the protein components of gap junctions heralded a new era, but compared to the progress achieved in deciphering other junctional structures, it looked as though cadherin and integrins were sprinting in a fast lane and leaving gap junctions behind. But gap junctions are not simple structures of contact between cells, they are in fact channels formed by the oligomerization of connexins: six connexins make a connexon or hemichannel, and two connexons from adjacent cells align in the extracellular space to make a full intercellular gap junction channel that allows direct communication between cells without using the extracellular space to exchange messages. Compared to classical ion channels, however, studies of intercellular ones have suffered from the lack of clear ionic selectivity and of specific toxins to probe their function. But if these aspects led to a grim mood among researchers, it has disappeared with the discovery that several genetic diseases are linked to mutations in connexin genes. The recent meeting on connexins and gap junctions, attended by the vast majority of people active in the field, confirmed some of the trends that have emerged and that are allowing us to make sense of the complexity of connexin language, and announced some of the new avenues that are beginning to be explored.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofGenome Biologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Communication - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCharcot-Marie-Tooth Disease - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshConnexins - Chemistry - Genetics - Metabolism - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshGap Junctions - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshProtein Conformationen_US
dc.subject.meshSignal Transductionen_US
dc.subject.meshSynapsesen_US
dc.subject.meshTerminology As Topicen_US
dc.titleLearning the language of cell-cell communication through connexin channelsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailBruzzone, R: bruzzone@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityBruzzone, R=rp01442en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid11737941-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC138979-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035191009en_US
dc.identifier.volume2en_US
dc.identifier.issue11en_US
dc.identifier.spage4027.1en_US
dc.identifier.epage4027.5en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBruzzone, R=7006793327en_US
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 160511 amended-

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