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Article: The range of passive arm circumduction in primates: Do hominoids really have more mobile shoulders?

TitleThe range of passive arm circumduction in primates: Do hominoids really have more mobile shoulders?
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/28130
Citation
American Journal Of Physical Anthropology, 2008, v. 136 n. 3, p. 265-277 How to Cite?
AbstractHominoids and lorines are assumed to possess greater shoulder mobility than other primates. This assumption is based on morphological characteristics of the shoulder, rather than on empirical data. However, recent studies have shown that the glenohumeral joint of hominoids is not more mobile than that of other primates (Chan LK. 2007. Glenohumeral mobility in primates. Folia Primatol (Basel) 78(1): 1-18), and the thoracic shape of hominoids does not necessarily promote shoulder mobility (Chan LK. 2007. Scapular position in primates. Folia Primatol (Basel) 78(1): 19-35). Moreover, lorines differ significantly from hominoids in both these features, thus challenging the assumption that both hominoids and lorines have greater shoulder mobility. The present study aims to test this assumption by collecting empirical data on shoulder mobility in 17 primate species. Passive arm circumduction (a combination of glenohumeral and pectoral girdle movement) was performed on sedated subjects (except humans), and the range measured on the video images of the circumduction. The motion differed among primate species mostly in the craniodorsal directions, the directions most relevant to the animal's ability to brachiate and slow climb. Hylobatids possessed the highest craniodorsal mobility among all primate species studied. However, nonhylobatid hominoids did not have greater craniodorsal mobility than arboreal quadrupedal monkeys, and lorines did not have greater craniodorsal mobility than arboreal quadrupedal prosimians. Nonhylobatid hominoids and lorines had similar craniodorsal mobility, but this was due to a longer clavicle, more dorsal scapula, and lower glenohumeral mobility in the former, and a shorter clavicle, less dorsal scapula, and greater glenohumeral mobility in the latter. This study provides evidence for the reexamination of the brachiation, slow climbing, and vertical climbing hypotheses. ©2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176325
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.402
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.410
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLap, KCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:09:21Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:09:21Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Physical Anthropology, 2008, v. 136 n. 3, p. 265-277en_US
dc.identifier.issn0002-9483en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176325-
dc.description.abstractHominoids and lorines are assumed to possess greater shoulder mobility than other primates. This assumption is based on morphological characteristics of the shoulder, rather than on empirical data. However, recent studies have shown that the glenohumeral joint of hominoids is not more mobile than that of other primates (Chan LK. 2007. Glenohumeral mobility in primates. Folia Primatol (Basel) 78(1): 1-18), and the thoracic shape of hominoids does not necessarily promote shoulder mobility (Chan LK. 2007. Scapular position in primates. Folia Primatol (Basel) 78(1): 19-35). Moreover, lorines differ significantly from hominoids in both these features, thus challenging the assumption that both hominoids and lorines have greater shoulder mobility. The present study aims to test this assumption by collecting empirical data on shoulder mobility in 17 primate species. Passive arm circumduction (a combination of glenohumeral and pectoral girdle movement) was performed on sedated subjects (except humans), and the range measured on the video images of the circumduction. The motion differed among primate species mostly in the craniodorsal directions, the directions most relevant to the animal's ability to brachiate and slow climb. Hylobatids possessed the highest craniodorsal mobility among all primate species studied. However, nonhylobatid hominoids did not have greater craniodorsal mobility than arboreal quadrupedal monkeys, and lorines did not have greater craniodorsal mobility than arboreal quadrupedal prosimians. Nonhylobatid hominoids and lorines had similar craniodorsal mobility, but this was due to a longer clavicle, more dorsal scapula, and lower glenohumeral mobility in the former, and a shorter clavicle, less dorsal scapula, and greater glenohumeral mobility in the latter. This study provides evidence for the reexamination of the brachiation, slow climbing, and vertical climbing hypotheses. ©2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/28130en_US
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Physical Anthropologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Biological - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshBiomechanicsen_US
dc.subject.meshMovement - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPrimates - Anatomy & Histology - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshShoulder - Anatomy & Histology - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSpecies Specificityen_US
dc.subject.meshStatistics, Nonparametricen_US
dc.titleThe range of passive arm circumduction in primates: Do hominoids really have more mobile shoulders?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLap, KC: lapki@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLap, KC=rp00536en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ajpa.20800en_US
dc.identifier.pmid18324636-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-46049111185en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-46049111185&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume136en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage265en_US
dc.identifier.epage277en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000256947900002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLap, KC=7403540426en_US

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