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Article: The church as a surrogate family for working class immigrant chinese youth: An ethnography of segmented assimilation

TitleThe church as a surrogate family for working class immigrant chinese youth: An ethnography of segmented assimilation
Authors
Issue Date2005
Citation
Sociology Of Religion: A Quarterly Review, 2005, v. 66 n. 2, p. 183-200 How to Cite?
AbstractBased on ethnographic data collected in a New York Chinatown church, this paper explores how ethnic socialization and upward assimilation work together, a primary theme of the segmented assimilation thesis, among working class immigrant Chinese youth who convert to Christianity. These youth are much more bi-cultural and more at risk than the Asian American youth who have received most of the attention in the immigrant religion literature. This study shows that the church facilitates youth socialization by being a nurturing surrogate family that compensates for the weakness of immigrant families and the lack of parental resources. This study suggests that working class immigrant Chinese conversion to Christianity involves a re-authoritization process in which the new authorities in the Western Christian world, as represented by the pastor's role as a foster father, replace the old ones embedded in traditional Chinese families and create an emotionally open culture for the marginalized youth. This emotionally open culture of the church places immigrant youth's adaptation in a supportive context.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176315
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.217
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.991
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCao, Nen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:09:07Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:09:07Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationSociology Of Religion: A Quarterly Review, 2005, v. 66 n. 2, p. 183-200en_US
dc.identifier.issn1069-4404en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176315-
dc.description.abstractBased on ethnographic data collected in a New York Chinatown church, this paper explores how ethnic socialization and upward assimilation work together, a primary theme of the segmented assimilation thesis, among working class immigrant Chinese youth who convert to Christianity. These youth are much more bi-cultural and more at risk than the Asian American youth who have received most of the attention in the immigrant religion literature. This study shows that the church facilitates youth socialization by being a nurturing surrogate family that compensates for the weakness of immigrant families and the lack of parental resources. This study suggests that working class immigrant Chinese conversion to Christianity involves a re-authoritization process in which the new authorities in the Western Christian world, as represented by the pastor's role as a foster father, replace the old ones embedded in traditional Chinese families and create an emotionally open culture for the marginalized youth. This emotionally open culture of the church places immigrant youth's adaptation in a supportive context.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSociology of Religion: A Quarterly Reviewen_US
dc.titleThe church as a surrogate family for working class immigrant chinese youth: An ethnography of segmented assimilationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCao, N: ncao@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCao, N=rp00850en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33646570861en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33646570861&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume66en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage183en_US
dc.identifier.epage200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCao, N=13409810900en_US

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