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Article: Reducing irregular migration from China

TitleReducing irregular migration from China
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/IMIG
Citation
International Migration, 2003, v. 41 n. 3, p. 49-72 How to Cite?
AbstractWith the development of China's economy since 1979, a new type of Chinese migrations has emerged, which is more diversified and quite distinct from previous migration patterns. Trafficking in human beings and other forms of irregular migration are one of the most pressing and complex human rights issues today, reaching across borders and affecting most of the countries in the world, with new and serious security implications. As part of the international irregular migration flows toward and into the European Union (EU), the Chinese, particularly from Fujian and Zhejiang provinces, have played a major role since the 1980s. To some extent, it could be said that China provides the largest number of East Asian irregular immigrants to Europe. Based on the fieldwork conducted in southern China over the past seven years, this paper proposes to examine current Chinese irregular migration trends. It will further present the Government's response regarding the migration modus operandi and policy implications with the aim of offering policy makers an empirical insight into the most active region of emigration in China. Because of the difficulty and sensitivity involved in collecting data on the topic, materials in this paper are mainly based on content analysis of local Chinese newspapers and my interviews with various people involved in irregular migration activities, such as "snakeheads", illegal migrants and their family members, and police, local, and government officials at different levels.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176314
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.684
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.763
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChin, JKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:09:07Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:09:07Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Migration, 2003, v. 41 n. 3, p. 49-72en_US
dc.identifier.issn0020-7985en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176314-
dc.description.abstractWith the development of China's economy since 1979, a new type of Chinese migrations has emerged, which is more diversified and quite distinct from previous migration patterns. Trafficking in human beings and other forms of irregular migration are one of the most pressing and complex human rights issues today, reaching across borders and affecting most of the countries in the world, with new and serious security implications. As part of the international irregular migration flows toward and into the European Union (EU), the Chinese, particularly from Fujian and Zhejiang provinces, have played a major role since the 1980s. To some extent, it could be said that China provides the largest number of East Asian irregular immigrants to Europe. Based on the fieldwork conducted in southern China over the past seven years, this paper proposes to examine current Chinese irregular migration trends. It will further present the Government's response regarding the migration modus operandi and policy implications with the aim of offering policy makers an empirical insight into the most active region of emigration in China. Because of the difficulty and sensitivity involved in collecting data on the topic, materials in this paper are mainly based on content analysis of local Chinese newspapers and my interviews with various people involved in irregular migration activities, such as "snakeheads", illegal migrants and their family members, and police, local, and government officials at different levels.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/IMIGen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Migrationen_US
dc.titleReducing irregular migration from Chinaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChin, JK: qianj@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChin, JK=rp00853en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1468-2435.00241-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0141526309en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0141526309&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume41en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage49en_US
dc.identifier.epage72en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000185315600003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChin, JK=36659032700en_US

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