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Article: Temporal changes in long-distance running performance of Asian children between 1964 and 2009

TitleTemporal changes in long-distance running performance of Asian children between 1964 and 2009
Authors
KeywordsChildren
Exercise
Fatigue
Running
Sex Differences
Sports
Issue Date2012
PublisherAdis International Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://sportsmedicine.adisonline.com/pt/
Citation
Sports Medicine, 2012, v. 42 n. 4, p. 267-279 How to Cite?
AbstractAerobic fitness is considered to be an important marker of current health and even a predictor of future health. The aim of this study was to systematically analyse the available scientific information on temporal changes in maximal long-distance running performance (a widely and long-used marker of aerobic fitness) of Asian children. A systematic review of the scientific literature was undertaken to locate studies explicitly reporting on temporal changes (spanning a minimum of 5 years) in maximal long-distance running of apparently healthy (free from known disease or injury) Asian children aged 917 years. Studies were located up to October 2010 via computerized searching of bibliographical databases, reference list searching and personal communication with international experts. Temporal changes were analysed at the country by sex by age by test level using best-fitting linear or polynomial regression models relating the year of testing to long-distance running performances expressed as average running speeds. Changes in means were expressed as percent changes and as standardized effect sizes. Eight studies reporting temporal changes in the long-distance running performance of 23897571 children aged 917 years from four Asian countries over the period 19642009 were included. Overall, there was a large decline in long-distance running performance equivalent to-16.6±1.3 (mean change±95 confidence interval) or-1.2±0.1 standard deviations. Temporal changes were generally consistent for different sex and age groups, but not for different countries, with large declines observed for children from China and the Republic of Korea, small declines for children from Japan and very small declines for children from Singapore. There is overwhelming evidence of meaningful declines in the maximal long-distance running performance of Asian children in recent decades, which are probably caused by a network of social, behavioural, physical, psychosocial and physiological factors. These declines highlight the need for regular surveillance of Asian childrens health-related fitness and proactive public health strategies. © 2012 Adis Data Information BV. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176078
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.579
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.503
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTomkinson, GRen_US
dc.contributor.authorMacfarlane, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorNoi, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorKim, DYen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Zen_US
dc.contributor.authorHong, Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:04:54Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:04:54Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationSports Medicine, 2012, v. 42 n. 4, p. 267-279en_US
dc.identifier.issn0112-1642en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176078-
dc.description.abstractAerobic fitness is considered to be an important marker of current health and even a predictor of future health. The aim of this study was to systematically analyse the available scientific information on temporal changes in maximal long-distance running performance (a widely and long-used marker of aerobic fitness) of Asian children. A systematic review of the scientific literature was undertaken to locate studies explicitly reporting on temporal changes (spanning a minimum of 5 years) in maximal long-distance running of apparently healthy (free from known disease or injury) Asian children aged 917 years. Studies were located up to October 2010 via computerized searching of bibliographical databases, reference list searching and personal communication with international experts. Temporal changes were analysed at the country by sex by age by test level using best-fitting linear or polynomial regression models relating the year of testing to long-distance running performances expressed as average running speeds. Changes in means were expressed as percent changes and as standardized effect sizes. Eight studies reporting temporal changes in the long-distance running performance of 23897571 children aged 917 years from four Asian countries over the period 19642009 were included. Overall, there was a large decline in long-distance running performance equivalent to-16.6±1.3 (mean change±95 confidence interval) or-1.2±0.1 standard deviations. Temporal changes were generally consistent for different sex and age groups, but not for different countries, with large declines observed for children from China and the Republic of Korea, small declines for children from Japan and very small declines for children from Singapore. There is overwhelming evidence of meaningful declines in the maximal long-distance running performance of Asian children in recent decades, which are probably caused by a network of social, behavioural, physical, psychosocial and physiological factors. These declines highlight the need for regular surveillance of Asian childrens health-related fitness and proactive public health strategies. © 2012 Adis Data Information BV. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAdis International Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://sportsmedicine.adisonline.com/pt/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofSports Medicineen_US
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectChildrenen_US
dc.subjectExerciseen_US
dc.subjectFatigueen_US
dc.subjectRunningen_US
dc.subjectSex Differencesen_US
dc.subjectSportsen_US
dc.titleTemporal changes in long-distance running performance of Asian children between 1964 and 2009en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMacFarlane, D: djmac@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMacFarlane, D=rp00934en_US
dc.description.naturepostprinten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.2165/11599160-000000000-00000en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84863260597en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros221764-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84863260597&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume42en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage267en_US
dc.identifier.epage279en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1179-2035-
dc.publisher.placeNew Zealanden_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTomkinson, GR=6603283160en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMacFarlane, D=7202978517en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNoi, S=36839080600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKim, DY=26650606200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, Z=42462571900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHong, R=55277961100en_US

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