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Article: Physiology of elite young female athletes

TitlePhysiology of elite young female athletes
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/MSPSC
Citation
Medicine And Sport Science, 2010, v. 56, p. 23-46 How to Cite?
AbstractThe participation of girls in elite sport has increased exponentially over the past 30 years. Despite these increases a tradition for recruiting boys for exercise studies persistsand our knowledge of the physiologic response to exercise in girls remains limited. Girls' physiology varies with age and maturation and is underpinned by a divergent hormonal milieu which begins early in foetal life. Sexual dimorphism underlies much of the physiologic response to exercise, and becomes most acute during adolescence when boys become taller, heavier, less fat and are more muscular than girls. Young girl athletes are not simply smaller, less muscular boys. The widening sex disparity in responses to exercise during puberty cannot always be accounted for by size. The woeful number of studies on girls and our prior inability to non-invasively study the complexity of the cellular metabolic response to exercise means an integrative understanding of girls' physiological responses to exercise remains elusive. Success in elite sport requires intense training, which for a long time was thought to cause disruption to normal growth and maturation. It would appear that exercise training, without other predisposing factors, is unlikely to cause aberrations to either growth or maturation. Nevertheless, there is clear evidence of a boundary between healthy and unhealthy levels of exertion when coupled with caloric limitation. Sports in which intense training is combined with the need for leanness may predispose girls to increased risk of skeletal and reproductive health problems, and ensuring risk is minimised should be a priority. © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176070
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.380
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMcmanus, AMen_US
dc.contributor.authorArmstrong, Nen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:04:51Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:04:51Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationMedicine And Sport Science, 2010, v. 56, p. 23-46en_US
dc.identifier.issn0254-5020en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176070-
dc.description.abstractThe participation of girls in elite sport has increased exponentially over the past 30 years. Despite these increases a tradition for recruiting boys for exercise studies persistsand our knowledge of the physiologic response to exercise in girls remains limited. Girls' physiology varies with age and maturation and is underpinned by a divergent hormonal milieu which begins early in foetal life. Sexual dimorphism underlies much of the physiologic response to exercise, and becomes most acute during adolescence when boys become taller, heavier, less fat and are more muscular than girls. Young girl athletes are not simply smaller, less muscular boys. The widening sex disparity in responses to exercise during puberty cannot always be accounted for by size. The woeful number of studies on girls and our prior inability to non-invasively study the complexity of the cellular metabolic response to exercise means an integrative understanding of girls' physiological responses to exercise remains elusive. Success in elite sport requires intense training, which for a long time was thought to cause disruption to normal growth and maturation. It would appear that exercise training, without other predisposing factors, is unlikely to cause aberrations to either growth or maturation. Nevertheless, there is clear evidence of a boundary between healthy and unhealthy levels of exertion when coupled with caloric limitation. Sports in which intense training is combined with the need for leanness may predispose girls to increased risk of skeletal and reproductive health problems, and ensuring risk is minimised should be a priority. © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/MSPSCen_US
dc.relation.ispartofMedicine and Sport Scienceen_US
dc.rightsMedicine and Sport Science. Copyright © S Karger AG.-
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAthletic Performance - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBlood Volumeen_US
dc.subject.meshBody Compositionen_US
dc.subject.meshBody Sizeen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshEnergy Metabolism - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshExercise - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFemale Athlete Triad Syndrome - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLactates - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshMuscle Fatigue - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMuscle Strength - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshOxygen Consumption - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysical Fitness - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPuberty - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRecovery Of Functionen_US
dc.titlePhysiology of elite young female athletesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMcManus, AM: alimac@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMcManus, AM=rp00936en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000320626en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21178365-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78751540429en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros204283-
dc.identifier.hkuros195551-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78751540429&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume56en_US
dc.identifier.spage23en_US
dc.identifier.epage46en_US
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerlanden_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcManus, AM=7004635919en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridArmstrong, N=7101927255en_US

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