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Article: Cognitive demands of error processing associated with preparation and execution of a motor skill

TitleCognitive demands of error processing associated with preparation and execution of a motor skill
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/concog
Citation
Consciousness And Cognition, 2010, v. 19 n. 4, p. 1058-1061 How to Cite?
AbstractMaxwell et al. [Maxwell, J. P., Masters, R. S. W., Kerr, E., & Weedon, E. (2001). The implicit benefit of learning without errors. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 54A, 1049-1068. The implicit benefit of learning without errors. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 54A, 1049-1068] suggested that, following unsuccessful movements, the learner forms hypotheses about the probable causes of the error and the required movement adjustments necessary for its elimination. Hypothesis testing is an explicit process that places demands on cognitive resources. Demands on cognitive resources can be identified by measuring probe reaction times (PRT) and movement times. Lengthened PRT and movement times reflects increased cognitive demands. Thus, PRT and movement times should be longer following errors, relative to successful, movements. This hypothesis was tested using a motor skill (golf putting). Furthermore, the association between error processing and the preparation and execution phases of movement was examined. The data confirmed that cognitive demand is greater for trials following an error, relative to trials without an error. This effect was apparent throughout learning and in both the preparatory and execution phases of the movement. Cognitive effort also appeared to be higher during movement preparation, relative to movement execution. © 2008.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176066
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.182
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.363
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, WKen_US
dc.contributor.authorMasters, RSWen_US
dc.contributor.authorMaxwell, JPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:04:50Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:04:50Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationConsciousness And Cognition, 2010, v. 19 n. 4, p. 1058-1061en_US
dc.identifier.issn1053-8100en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176066-
dc.description.abstractMaxwell et al. [Maxwell, J. P., Masters, R. S. W., Kerr, E., & Weedon, E. (2001). The implicit benefit of learning without errors. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 54A, 1049-1068. The implicit benefit of learning without errors. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 54A, 1049-1068] suggested that, following unsuccessful movements, the learner forms hypotheses about the probable causes of the error and the required movement adjustments necessary for its elimination. Hypothesis testing is an explicit process that places demands on cognitive resources. Demands on cognitive resources can be identified by measuring probe reaction times (PRT) and movement times. Lengthened PRT and movement times reflects increased cognitive demands. Thus, PRT and movement times should be longer following errors, relative to successful, movements. This hypothesis was tested using a motor skill (golf putting). Furthermore, the association between error processing and the preparation and execution phases of movement was examined. The data confirmed that cognitive demand is greater for trials following an error, relative to trials without an error. This effect was apparent throughout learning and in both the preparatory and execution phases of the movement. Cognitive effort also appeared to be higher during movement preparation, relative to movement execution. © 2008.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/concogen_US
dc.relation.ispartofConsciousness and Cognitionen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAttentionen_US
dc.subject.meshCognitionen_US
dc.subject.meshDistance Perceptionen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMotor Skillsen_US
dc.subject.meshOrientationen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychomotor Performanceen_US
dc.subject.meshReaction Timeen_US
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_US
dc.titleCognitive demands of error processing associated with preparation and execution of a motor skillen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMasters, RSW: mastersr@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMasters, RSW=rp00935en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.concog.2008.11.005en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21074112-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78149483901en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros183319-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78149483901&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume19en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage1058en_US
dc.identifier.epage1061en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000284519800021-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, WK=35237823600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMasters, RSW=7102880488en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMaxwell, JP=7201610565en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike8339948-

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