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Article: Can a motivational intervention overcome an unsupportive environment for walking-findings from the step-by-step study

TitleCan a motivational intervention overcome an unsupportive environment for walking-findings from the step-by-step study
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/12160
Citation
Annals Of Behavioral Medicine, 2009, v. 38 n. 2, p. 137-146 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Interventions to promote walking have rarely examined how their effects varied by the attributes of the physical environment. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine whether perceptions of environmental walkability predicted change in walking behavior following an individual-based intervention to promote walking and whether the intervention buffered the effects of unsupportive environment for walking. Methods: Inactive adults (aged 30-65 years, 85% women) who completed a 3-month randomized control trial comparing the effect of a single mail-out of a theoretically based self-help walking program (WP, n=102); the same program plus a pedometer (WPP, n=105); and a "no-treatment" control group (C, n=107). Measures included change in self-reported walking time for all purposes and in the proportion of people reporting regular walking (i.e., ≥150 min/week and ≥5 sessions/wk). Perceptions of environmental esthetics, safety from crime, proximity to destinations, access to walking facilities, traffic, streetlights, connectivity, and hilliness were assessed at baseline and dichotomized into "low" or "high" by the median score. Covariates were social support, self-efficacy, intention to change behavior, and sociodemographic characteristics. Results: Adjusting for baseline walking, significant covariates, and study groups, walking time at follow-up was lower if streetlights or esthetics were perceived to be "low" (-24% and -22%, respectively) compared with "high" (p<0.05). In "low" esthetic conditions, those in the WPP were significantly more likely than controls to increase total walking time (Exp (b)=2.53, p<0.01) and to undertake regular walking (OR=5.85, 95% CI 2.60-12.2), whereas in esthetically pleasing environments, the between-group differences were nonsignificant. Conclusions: Walkability attributes can influence individual-based walking programs. Some environmental barriers for walking can be overcome by motivational aids. © 2009 The Society of Behavioral Medicine.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176061
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.195
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.112
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMerom, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorBauman, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorPhongsavan, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorCerin, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorKassis, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, BJen_US
dc.contributor.authorRissel, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:04:48Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:04:48Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationAnnals Of Behavioral Medicine, 2009, v. 38 n. 2, p. 137-146en_US
dc.identifier.issn0883-6612en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176061-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Interventions to promote walking have rarely examined how their effects varied by the attributes of the physical environment. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine whether perceptions of environmental walkability predicted change in walking behavior following an individual-based intervention to promote walking and whether the intervention buffered the effects of unsupportive environment for walking. Methods: Inactive adults (aged 30-65 years, 85% women) who completed a 3-month randomized control trial comparing the effect of a single mail-out of a theoretically based self-help walking program (WP, n=102); the same program plus a pedometer (WPP, n=105); and a "no-treatment" control group (C, n=107). Measures included change in self-reported walking time for all purposes and in the proportion of people reporting regular walking (i.e., ≥150 min/week and ≥5 sessions/wk). Perceptions of environmental esthetics, safety from crime, proximity to destinations, access to walking facilities, traffic, streetlights, connectivity, and hilliness were assessed at baseline and dichotomized into "low" or "high" by the median score. Covariates were social support, self-efficacy, intention to change behavior, and sociodemographic characteristics. Results: Adjusting for baseline walking, significant covariates, and study groups, walking time at follow-up was lower if streetlights or esthetics were perceived to be "low" (-24% and -22%, respectively) compared with "high" (p<0.05). In "low" esthetic conditions, those in the WPP were significantly more likely than controls to increase total walking time (Exp (b)=2.53, p<0.01) and to undertake regular walking (OR=5.85, 95% CI 2.60-12.2), whereas in esthetically pleasing environments, the between-group differences were nonsignificant. Conclusions: Walkability attributes can influence individual-based walking programs. Some environmental barriers for walking can be overcome by motivational aids. © 2009 The Society of Behavioral Medicine.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/12160en_US
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of Behavioral Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshEnvironmenten_US
dc.subject.meshExercise - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Behavioren_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Promotion - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshMotivationen_US
dc.subject.meshMotor Activityen_US
dc.subject.meshMultivariate Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshOdds Ratioen_US
dc.subject.meshPerceptionen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshSelf Efficacyen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Supporten_US
dc.subject.meshWalking - Psychologyen_US
dc.titleCan a motivational intervention overcome an unsupportive environment for walking-findings from the step-by-step studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCerin, E=rp00890en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12160-009-9138-zen_US
dc.identifier.pmid19806414-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-73349105580en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros168396-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-73349105580&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume38en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage137en_US
dc.identifier.epage146en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000272780500007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMerom, D=6602312812en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBauman, A=25421265100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPhongsavan, P=8549629800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCerin, E=14522064200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKassis, M=35784442100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBrown, W=7404196030en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSmith, BJ=7501693900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRissel, C=7005141427en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike5917601-

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