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Article: How socio-economic status contributes to participation in leisure-time physical activity

TitleHow socio-economic status contributes to participation in leisure-time physical activity
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/socscimed
Citation
Social Science And Medicine, 2008, v. 66 n. 12, p. 2596-2609 How to Cite?
AbstractThe aim of this cross-sectional study was to identify individual, social, and environmental contributors (mediators) to individual- and area-level differences in leisure-time physical activity across socio-economic groups. A two-stage stratified sampling design was used to recruit 20-65 year old adults (N = 2194) living in 154 census collection districts of Adelaide, Australia (overall response rate: 12%). Participants completed two surveys six months apart (response rate on the second survey: 83%). Individual-level socio-economic status (SES) was assessed using self-report measures on educational attainment, household income, and household size. Area-level SES was assessed using census data on median household income and household size for each selected census district. Bootstrap generalized linear models were used to examine associations between SES, potential mediators, and leisure-time physical activity. The product-of-coefficient test was used to estimate mediating effects. All SES measures were independently associated with potential individual and social mediators of the SES-activity relationships. Individual- and area-level income was also associated with perceived neighborhood attributes. Self-efficacy and social support for physical activity explained virtually all of the differences in physical activity across educational attainment groups. Physical barriers to walking and access to public open space contributed in part to the explanation of differences in recreational walking across income groups. Yet, self-efficacy and social support were the key mediators of the observed relationships between individual- and area-level income and physical activity. This study suggests that in order to increase physical activity participation in the more disadvantaged segments of the population, comprehensive, multilevel interventions targeting activity-related attitudes and skills as well as social and physical environments are needed. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176046
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.814
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.894
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCerin, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorLeslie, Een_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:04:42Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:04:42Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationSocial Science And Medicine, 2008, v. 66 n. 12, p. 2596-2609en_US
dc.identifier.issn0277-9536en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176046-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this cross-sectional study was to identify individual, social, and environmental contributors (mediators) to individual- and area-level differences in leisure-time physical activity across socio-economic groups. A two-stage stratified sampling design was used to recruit 20-65 year old adults (N = 2194) living in 154 census collection districts of Adelaide, Australia (overall response rate: 12%). Participants completed two surveys six months apart (response rate on the second survey: 83%). Individual-level socio-economic status (SES) was assessed using self-report measures on educational attainment, household income, and household size. Area-level SES was assessed using census data on median household income and household size for each selected census district. Bootstrap generalized linear models were used to examine associations between SES, potential mediators, and leisure-time physical activity. The product-of-coefficient test was used to estimate mediating effects. All SES measures were independently associated with potential individual and social mediators of the SES-activity relationships. Individual- and area-level income was also associated with perceived neighborhood attributes. Self-efficacy and social support for physical activity explained virtually all of the differences in physical activity across educational attainment groups. Physical barriers to walking and access to public open space contributed in part to the explanation of differences in recreational walking across income groups. Yet, self-efficacy and social support were the key mediators of the observed relationships between individual- and area-level income and physical activity. This study suggests that in order to increase physical activity participation in the more disadvantaged segments of the population, comprehensive, multilevel interventions targeting activity-related attitudes and skills as well as social and physical environments are needed. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/socscimeden_US
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Science and Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshEducational Statusen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIncomeen_US
dc.subject.meshLeisure Activitiesen_US
dc.subject.meshLinear Modelsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Theoreticalen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Classen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Supporten_US
dc.titleHow socio-economic status contributes to participation in leisure-time physical activityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCerin, E=rp00890en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.socscimed.2008.02.012en_US
dc.identifier.pmid18359137-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-43249084729en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros165038-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-43249084729&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume66en_US
dc.identifier.issue12en_US
dc.identifier.spage2596en_US
dc.identifier.epage2609en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000256934800019-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCerin, E=14522064200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeslie, E=7004928143en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike9932830-

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