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Article: Neighborhood Walkability and the Walking Behavior of Australian Adults

TitleNeighborhood Walkability and the Walking Behavior of Australian Adults
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/amepre
Citation
American Journal Of Preventive Medicine, 2007, v. 33 n. 5, p. 387-395 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The physical attributes of residential neighborhoods, particularly the connectedness of streets and the proximity of destinations, can influence walking behaviors. To provide the evidence for public health advocacy on activity-friendly environments, large-scale studies in different countries are needed. Associations of neighborhood physical environments with adults' walking for transport and walking for recreation must be better understood. Method: Walking for transport and walking for recreation were assessed with a validated survey among 2650 adults recruited from neighborhoods in an Australian city between July 2003 and June 2004, with neighborhoods selected to have either high or low walkability, based on objective measures of connectedness and proximity derived from geographic information systems (GIS) databases. The study design was stratified by area-level socioeconomic status, while analyses controlled for participant age, gender, individual-level socioeconomic status, and reasons for neighborhood self-selection. Results: A strong independent positive association was found between weekly frequency of walking for transport and the objectively derived neighborhood walkability index. Preference for walkable neighborhoods moderated the relationship of walkability with weekly minutes, but not the frequency of walking for transport-walkability was related to higher frequency of transport walking, irrespective of neighborhood self-selection. There were no significant associations between environmental factors and walking for recreation. Conclusions: Associations of neighborhood walkability attributes with walking for transport were confirmed in Australia. They accounted for a modest but statistically significant proportion of the total variation of the relevant walking behavior. The physical environment attributes that make up the walkability index are potentially important candidate factors for future environmental and policy initiatives designed to increase physical activity. © 2007 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176040
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.465
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.764
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOwen, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorCerin, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorLeslie, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorDutoit, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorCoffee, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorFrank, LDen_US
dc.contributor.authorBauman, AEen_US
dc.contributor.authorHugo, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorSaelens, BEen_US
dc.contributor.authorSallis, JFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:04:41Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:04:41Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Preventive Medicine, 2007, v. 33 n. 5, p. 387-395en_US
dc.identifier.issn0749-3797en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176040-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The physical attributes of residential neighborhoods, particularly the connectedness of streets and the proximity of destinations, can influence walking behaviors. To provide the evidence for public health advocacy on activity-friendly environments, large-scale studies in different countries are needed. Associations of neighborhood physical environments with adults' walking for transport and walking for recreation must be better understood. Method: Walking for transport and walking for recreation were assessed with a validated survey among 2650 adults recruited from neighborhoods in an Australian city between July 2003 and June 2004, with neighborhoods selected to have either high or low walkability, based on objective measures of connectedness and proximity derived from geographic information systems (GIS) databases. The study design was stratified by area-level socioeconomic status, while analyses controlled for participant age, gender, individual-level socioeconomic status, and reasons for neighborhood self-selection. Results: A strong independent positive association was found between weekly frequency of walking for transport and the objectively derived neighborhood walkability index. Preference for walkable neighborhoods moderated the relationship of walkability with weekly minutes, but not the frequency of walking for transport-walkability was related to higher frequency of transport walking, irrespective of neighborhood self-selection. There were no significant associations between environmental factors and walking for recreation. Conclusions: Associations of neighborhood walkability attributes with walking for transport were confirmed in Australia. They accounted for a modest but statistically significant proportion of the total variation of the relevant walking behavior. The physical environment attributes that make up the walkability index are potentially important candidate factors for future environmental and policy initiatives designed to increase physical activity. © 2007 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/amepreen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAustraliaen_US
dc.subject.meshEnvironment Designen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Behavioren_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshRecreationen_US
dc.subject.meshResidence Characteristicsen_US
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshWalkingen_US
dc.titleNeighborhood Walkability and the Walking Behavior of Australian Adultsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCerin, E=rp00890en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.amepre.2007.07.025en_US
dc.identifier.pmid17950404-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-35348896800en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros165035-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-35348896800&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume33en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage387en_US
dc.identifier.epage395en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000250458400005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOwen, N=7102307209en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCerin, E=14522064200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeslie, E=7004928143en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridduToit, L=22834045800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCoffee, N=54970671200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFrank, LD=7201908054en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBauman, AE=25421265100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHugo, G=7005652367en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSaelens, BE=6701427555en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSallis, JF=7102766542en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike6215762-

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