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Article: Small-scale randomized controlled trials need more powerful methods of mediational analysis than the Baron-Kenny method

TitleSmall-scale randomized controlled trials need more powerful methods of mediational analysis than the Baron-Kenny method
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jclinepi
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Epidemiology, 2006, v. 59 n. 5, p. 457-464 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To devise more-effective physical activity interventions, the mediating mechanisms yielding behavioral change need to be identified. The Baron-Kenny method is most commonly used, but has low statistical power and may not identify mechanisms of behavioral change in small-to-medium size studies. More powerful statistical tests are available. Study Design and Setting: Inactive adults (N = 52) were randomized to either a print or a print-plus-telephone intervention. Walking and exercise-related social support were assessed at baseline, after the intervention, and 4 weeks later. The Baron-Kenny and three alternative methods of mediational analysis (Freedman-Schatzkin; MacKinnon et al.; bootstrap method) were used to examine the effects of social support on initial behavior change and maintenance. Results: A significant mediational effect of social support on initial behavior change was indicated by the MacKinnon et al., bootstrap, and, marginally, Freedman-Schatzkin methods, but not by the Baron-Kenny method. No significant mediational effect of social support on maintenance of walking was found. Conclusions: Methodologically rigorous intervention studies to identify mediators of change in physical activity are costly and labor intensive, and may not be feasible with large samples. The use of statistically powerful tests of mediational effects in small-scale studies can inform the development of more effective interventions. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176030
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.703
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.559
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCerin, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, LMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeslie, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorOwen, Nen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:04:36Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:04:36Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Epidemiology, 2006, v. 59 n. 5, p. 457-464en_US
dc.identifier.issn0895-4356en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176030-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To devise more-effective physical activity interventions, the mediating mechanisms yielding behavioral change need to be identified. The Baron-Kenny method is most commonly used, but has low statistical power and may not identify mechanisms of behavioral change in small-to-medium size studies. More powerful statistical tests are available. Study Design and Setting: Inactive adults (N = 52) were randomized to either a print or a print-plus-telephone intervention. Walking and exercise-related social support were assessed at baseline, after the intervention, and 4 weeks later. The Baron-Kenny and three alternative methods of mediational analysis (Freedman-Schatzkin; MacKinnon et al.; bootstrap method) were used to examine the effects of social support on initial behavior change and maintenance. Results: A significant mediational effect of social support on initial behavior change was indicated by the MacKinnon et al., bootstrap, and, marginally, Freedman-Schatzkin methods, but not by the Baron-Kenny method. No significant mediational effect of social support on maintenance of walking was found. Conclusions: Methodologically rigorous intervention studies to identify mediators of change in physical activity are costly and labor intensive, and may not be feasible with large samples. The use of statistically powerful tests of mediational effects in small-scale studies can inform the development of more effective interventions. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jclinepien_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshExerciseen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Behavioren_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Educationen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Promotionen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Statisticalen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Supporten_US
dc.subject.meshTelephoneen_US
dc.subject.meshWalkingen_US
dc.titleSmall-scale randomized controlled trials need more powerful methods of mediational analysis than the Baron-Kenny methoden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCerin, E=rp00890en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jclinepi.2005.11.008en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16632133-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33646019272en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33646019272&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume59en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage457en_US
dc.identifier.epage464en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000237481600003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCerin, E=14522064200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTaylor, LM=13009043300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeslie, E=7004928143en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOwen, N=7102307209en_US

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