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Article: Single-subject research designs and data analyses for assessing elite athletes' conditioning

TitleSingle-subject research designs and data analyses for assessing elite athletes' conditioning
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherAdis International Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://sportsmedicine.adisonline.com/pt/
Citation
Sports Medicine, 2004, v. 34 n. 15, p. 1035-1050 How to Cite?
AbstractResearch in conditioning (all the processes of preparation for competition) has used group research designs, where multiple athletes are observed at one or more points in time. However, empirical reports of large inter-individual differences in response to conditioning regimens suggest that applied conditioning research would greatly benefit from single-subject research designs. Single-subject research designs allow us to find out the extent to which a specific conditioning regimen works for a specific athlete, as opposed to the average athlete, who is the focal point of group research designs. The aim of the following review is to outline the strategies and procedures of single-subject research as they pertain to the assessment of conditioning for individual athletes. The four main experimental designs in single-subject research are: the AB design, reversal (withdrawal) designs and their extensions, multiple baseline designs and alternating treatment designs. Visual and statistical analyses commonly used to analyse single-subject data, and advantages and limitations are discussed. Modelling of multivariate single-subject data using techniques such as dynamic factor analysis and structural equation modelling may identify individualised models of conditioning leading to better prediction of performance. Despite problems associated with data analyses in single-subject research (e.g. serial dependency), sports scientists should use single-subject research designs in applied conditioning research to understand how well an intervention (e.g. a training method) works and to predict performance for a particular athlete.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176022
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.579
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.503
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKinugasa, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorCerin, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorHooper, Sen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:04:34Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:04:34Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationSports Medicine, 2004, v. 34 n. 15, p. 1035-1050en_US
dc.identifier.issn0112-1642en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176022-
dc.description.abstractResearch in conditioning (all the processes of preparation for competition) has used group research designs, where multiple athletes are observed at one or more points in time. However, empirical reports of large inter-individual differences in response to conditioning regimens suggest that applied conditioning research would greatly benefit from single-subject research designs. Single-subject research designs allow us to find out the extent to which a specific conditioning regimen works for a specific athlete, as opposed to the average athlete, who is the focal point of group research designs. The aim of the following review is to outline the strategies and procedures of single-subject research as they pertain to the assessment of conditioning for individual athletes. The four main experimental designs in single-subject research are: the AB design, reversal (withdrawal) designs and their extensions, multiple baseline designs and alternating treatment designs. Visual and statistical analyses commonly used to analyse single-subject data, and advantages and limitations are discussed. Modelling of multivariate single-subject data using techniques such as dynamic factor analysis and structural equation modelling may identify individualised models of conditioning leading to better prediction of performance. Despite problems associated with data analyses in single-subject research (e.g. serial dependency), sports scientists should use single-subject research designs in applied conditioning research to understand how well an intervention (e.g. a training method) works and to predict performance for a particular athlete.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAdis International Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://sportsmedicine.adisonline.com/pt/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofSports Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAustraliaen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysical Fitness - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshResearch Designen_US
dc.subject.meshSample Sizeen_US
dc.subject.meshSportsen_US
dc.subject.meshStatistics As Topicen_US
dc.titleSingle-subject research designs and data analyses for assessing elite athletes' conditioningen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCerin, E: ecerin@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCerin, E=rp00890en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.2165/00007256-200434150-00003en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15575794-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-10844220668en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-10844220668&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume34en_US
dc.identifier.issue15en_US
dc.identifier.spage1035en_US
dc.identifier.epage1050en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000225989600002-
dc.publisher.placeNew Zealanden_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKinugasa, T=7004506949en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCerin, E=14522064200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHooper, S=7102681287en_US

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