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Article: Aerobic fitness of prepubescent children.

TitleAerobic fitness of prepubescent children.
Authors
Issue Date1995
PublisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/03014460.html
Citation
Annals Of Human Biology, 1995, v. 22 n. 5, p. 427-441 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study was designed to enhance understanding of the assessment and interpretation of the aerobic fitness of prepubertal children. Written informed consent to participate was obtained from 70% of the children in year six of the 15 state schools in the city of Exeter. Twenty-five per cent of the eligible children in each school were randomly selected from those who volunteered. The data reported here are those obtained from the 111 boys (11.1 SD 0.4 years) and 53 girls (10.9 SD 0.3 years) classified as Tanner stage 1 in both pubic hair rating and either genitalia rating (boys) or breast rating (girls). Peak oxygen uptake (peak VO2) was determined using a discontinuous, incremental protocol on a treadmill. Only a minority of children demonstrated a levelling-off or plateau in VO2 despite an increase in exercise intensity. There was no evidence to suggest that the children who demonstrated a VO2 plateau had significantly (p < 0.05) higher peak VO2, peak heart rate, peak respiratory exchange ratio or peak blood lactate than those children who did not demonstrate a plateau in VO2. These findings indicate that a VO2 plateau should not be used as a requirement for defining a maximal exercise test with prepubertal children. Boys had a significantly (p < 0.01) higher peak VO2 than girls, whether expressed in 1.min-1 (1.78 vs 1.46) or in relation to body mass (51 vs 45 ml.kg-1.min-1). The results compare favourably with those of similarly aged children from other countries, but why prepubescent boys have significantly higher (13.3%) mass-related peak VO2 than prepubescent girls is not readily apparent. Although conventional, the expression of peak VO2 as per body mass ratio may not adequately partition out body-size differences. The influence of body mass was therefore removed using a linear adjustment scaling model and a log-linear model, but the boys' peak VO2 remained significantly (p < 0.01) higher than the girls' peak VO2 with the difference now being 16.0% and 16.2%, respectively.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176009
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.57
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.689
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorArmstrong, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorKirby, BJen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcmanus, AMen_US
dc.contributor.authorWelsman, JRen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:04:30Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:04:30Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.identifier.citationAnnals Of Human Biology, 1995, v. 22 n. 5, p. 427-441en_US
dc.identifier.issn0301-4460en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/176009-
dc.description.abstractThis study was designed to enhance understanding of the assessment and interpretation of the aerobic fitness of prepubertal children. Written informed consent to participate was obtained from 70% of the children in year six of the 15 state schools in the city of Exeter. Twenty-five per cent of the eligible children in each school were randomly selected from those who volunteered. The data reported here are those obtained from the 111 boys (11.1 SD 0.4 years) and 53 girls (10.9 SD 0.3 years) classified as Tanner stage 1 in both pubic hair rating and either genitalia rating (boys) or breast rating (girls). Peak oxygen uptake (peak VO2) was determined using a discontinuous, incremental protocol on a treadmill. Only a minority of children demonstrated a levelling-off or plateau in VO2 despite an increase in exercise intensity. There was no evidence to suggest that the children who demonstrated a VO2 plateau had significantly (p < 0.05) higher peak VO2, peak heart rate, peak respiratory exchange ratio or peak blood lactate than those children who did not demonstrate a plateau in VO2. These findings indicate that a VO2 plateau should not be used as a requirement for defining a maximal exercise test with prepubertal children. Boys had a significantly (p < 0.01) higher peak VO2 than girls, whether expressed in 1.min-1 (1.78 vs 1.46) or in relation to body mass (51 vs 45 ml.kg-1.min-1). The results compare favourably with those of similarly aged children from other countries, but why prepubescent boys have significantly higher (13.3%) mass-related peak VO2 than prepubescent girls is not readily apparent. Although conventional, the expression of peak VO2 as per body mass ratio may not adequately partition out body-size differences. The influence of body mass was therefore removed using a linear adjustment scaling model and a log-linear model, but the boys' peak VO2 remained significantly (p < 0.01) higher than the girls' peak VO2 with the difference now being 16.0% and 16.2%, respectively.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/03014460.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of human biologyen_US
dc.rightsAnnals of Human Biology. Copyright © Informa Healthcare.-
dc.subject.meshAnalysis Of Varianceen_US
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshEnglanden_US
dc.subject.meshExercise - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshExercise Testen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLinear Modelsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshOxygen Consumptionen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysical Fitness - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Function Testsen_US
dc.titleAerobic fitness of prepubescent children.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMcManus, AM: alimac@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMcManus, AM=rp00936en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/03014469500004102-
dc.identifier.pmid8744997-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029367319en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros13814-
dc.identifier.volume22en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage427en_US
dc.identifier.epage441en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1995TG82800004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridArmstrong, N=7101927255en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKirby, BJ=21334715300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcManus, AM=7004635919en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWelsman, JR=6701780313en_US

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