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Article: A neurochemical approach to valuation sensitivity over gains and losses

TitleA neurochemical approach to valuation sensitivity over gains and losses
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherThe Royal Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pubs.royalsoc.ac.uk/index.cfm?page=1087
Citation
Proceedings Of The Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 2009, v. 276 n. 1676, p. 4181-4188 How to Cite?
AbstractProspect theory proposes the hypothesis that people have diminishing sensitivity in valuing increases in the size of monetary outcomes, for both gains and losses. For decision-making under risk, this implies a tendency to be risk-tolerant over losses while being generally risk averse over gains. We offer a neurochemistry-based model of the diminishing valuation sensitivity hypothesis. Specifically, we propose that dopamine tone modulates the sensitivity towards valuation of gains while serotonin tone modulates the sensitivity towards valuation of losses. Consequently, higher dopamine tone would yield a more concave valuation function over gains while higher serotonin tone would yield a more convex valuation function over losses. Using a neurogenetics strategy to test our neurochemical model, we find that subjects with the 9-repeat allele of DAT1 (lower DA tone) are more risk-tolerant over gains than subjects with the 10-repeat allele, and that subjects with the 10-repeat allele of STin2 (higher 5HT tone) are more risk-tolerant over losses than subjects with the 12-repeat allele. Overall, our results support the implications of our model and provide the first neurogenetics evidence that risk attitudes are partially hard-wired in differentiating between gain- and loss-oriented risks. © 2009 The Royal Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175981
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.823
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.375
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhong, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorIsrael, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorXue, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, PCen_US
dc.contributor.authorEbstein, RPen_US
dc.contributor.authorChew, SHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:03:12Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:03:12Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationProceedings Of The Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 2009, v. 276 n. 1676, p. 4181-4188en_US
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175981-
dc.description.abstractProspect theory proposes the hypothesis that people have diminishing sensitivity in valuing increases in the size of monetary outcomes, for both gains and losses. For decision-making under risk, this implies a tendency to be risk-tolerant over losses while being generally risk averse over gains. We offer a neurochemistry-based model of the diminishing valuation sensitivity hypothesis. Specifically, we propose that dopamine tone modulates the sensitivity towards valuation of gains while serotonin tone modulates the sensitivity towards valuation of losses. Consequently, higher dopamine tone would yield a more concave valuation function over gains while higher serotonin tone would yield a more convex valuation function over losses. Using a neurogenetics strategy to test our neurochemical model, we find that subjects with the 9-repeat allele of DAT1 (lower DA tone) are more risk-tolerant over gains than subjects with the 10-repeat allele, and that subjects with the 10-repeat allele of STin2 (higher 5HT tone) are more risk-tolerant over losses than subjects with the 12-repeat allele. Overall, our results support the implications of our model and provide the first neurogenetics evidence that risk attitudes are partially hard-wired in differentiating between gain- and loss-oriented risks. © 2009 The Royal Society.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe Royal Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pubs.royalsoc.ac.uk/index.cfm?page=1087en_US
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciencesen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBrain Chemistry - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshChinaen_US
dc.subject.meshDna Primers - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshDecision Making - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDopamine - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshDopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshElectrophoresis, Agar Gelen_US
dc.subject.meshGenotypeen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Neurologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshPolymerase Chain Reactionen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk-Takingen_US
dc.subject.meshSerotonin - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshSerotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins - Geneticsen_US
dc.titleA neurochemical approach to valuation sensitivity over gains and lossesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, PC: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, PC=rp00459en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rspb.2009.1312en_US
dc.identifier.pmid19726478-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-72849129815en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-72849129815&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume276en_US
dc.identifier.issue1676en_US
dc.identifier.spage4181en_US
dc.identifier.epage4188en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000271055400012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhong, S=25722465400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridIsrael, S=24471883000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXue, H=35235981600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, PC=34573429300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEbstein, RP=7007152650en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChew, SH=20336954200en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike6031019-

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