File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Combining dimensional and categorical representation of psychosis: The way forward for DSM-V and ICD-11?

TitleCombining dimensional and categorical representation of psychosis: The way forward for DSM-V and ICD-11?
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSM
Citation
Psychological Medicine, 2009, v. 39 n. 12, p. 1943-1955 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground There is good evidence that psychotic symptoms segregate into symptom dimensions. However, it is still unclear how these dimensions are associated with risk indicators and other clinical variables, and whether they have advantages over categorical diagnosis in clinical practice. We investigated symptom dimensions in a first-onset psychosis sample and examined their associations with risk indicators and clinical variables. We then examined the relationship of categorical diagnoses to the same variables.Method We recruited 536 patients as part of a population-based, incidence study of psychosis. Psychopathology was assessed using the Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN). A principal axis factor analysis was performed on symptom scores. The relationship of dimension scores with risk indicators and with clinical variables was then examined employing regression analyses. Finally, regression models were compared to assess the contribution of dimensions versus diagnosis in explaining these variables.Results Factor analysis gave rise to a five-factor solution of manic, reality distortion, negative, depressive and disorganization symptom dimensions. The scores of identified dimensions were differentially associated with specific variables. The manic dimension had the highest number of significant associations; strong correlations were observed with shorter duration of untreated psychosis, acute mode of onset and compulsory admission. Adding dimensional scores to diagnostic categories significantly increased the amount of variability explained in predicting these variables; the reverse was also true but to a lesser extent.Conclusions Categorical and dimensional representations of psychosis are complementary. Using both appears to be a promising strategy in conceptualising psychotic illnesses. © 2009 Cambridge University Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175980
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.491
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.843
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDemjaha, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorLandau, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorDean, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorReichenberg, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorFearon, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorHutchinson, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorJones, PBen_US
dc.contributor.authorMurray, RMen_US
dc.contributor.authorDazzan, Pen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:03:12Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:03:12Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsychological Medicine, 2009, v. 39 n. 12, p. 1943-1955en_US
dc.identifier.issn0033-2917en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175980-
dc.description.abstractBackground There is good evidence that psychotic symptoms segregate into symptom dimensions. However, it is still unclear how these dimensions are associated with risk indicators and other clinical variables, and whether they have advantages over categorical diagnosis in clinical practice. We investigated symptom dimensions in a first-onset psychosis sample and examined their associations with risk indicators and clinical variables. We then examined the relationship of categorical diagnoses to the same variables.Method We recruited 536 patients as part of a population-based, incidence study of psychosis. Psychopathology was assessed using the Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN). A principal axis factor analysis was performed on symptom scores. The relationship of dimension scores with risk indicators and with clinical variables was then examined employing regression analyses. Finally, regression models were compared to assess the contribution of dimensions versus diagnosis in explaining these variables.Results Factor analysis gave rise to a five-factor solution of manic, reality distortion, negative, depressive and disorganization symptom dimensions. The scores of identified dimensions were differentially associated with specific variables. The manic dimension had the highest number of significant associations; strong correlations were observed with shorter duration of untreated psychosis, acute mode of onset and compulsory admission. Adding dimensional scores to diagnostic categories significantly increased the amount of variability explained in predicting these variables; the reverse was also true but to a lesser extent.Conclusions Categorical and dimensional representations of psychosis are complementary. Using both appears to be a promising strategy in conceptualising psychotic illnesses. © 2009 Cambridge University Press.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSMen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshComorbidityen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshDiagnostic And Statistical Manual Of Mental Disordersen_US
dc.subject.meshFactor Analysis, Statisticalen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen_US
dc.subject.meshIntelligenceen_US
dc.subject.meshInternational Classification Of Diseasesen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMarijuana Abuse - Epidemiology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPatient Admissionen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scales - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychometricsen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychotic Disorders - Classification - Diagnosis - Epidemiology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Behavioren_US
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_US
dc.titleCombining dimensional and categorical representation of psychosis: The way forward for DSM-V and ICD-11?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, P: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, P=rp00459en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0033291709990651en_US
dc.identifier.pmid19627645-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-70449678722en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-70449678722&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume39en_US
dc.identifier.issue12en_US
dc.identifier.spage1943en_US
dc.identifier.epage1955en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000272369400002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDemjaha, A=23970361800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMorgan, K=7401575547en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMorgan, C=8559399400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLandau, S=7101776972en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDean, K=8775217700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridReichenberg, A=6603720193en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, P=34573429300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFearon, P=7003273960en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHutchinson, G=35113301500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJones, PB=36078972900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMurray, RM=35406239400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDazzan, P=6602196376en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats