File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Association of genetic risks for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder with specific and generic brain structural endophenotypes

TitleAssociation of genetic risks for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder with specific and generic brain structural endophenotypes
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archgenpsychiatry.com
Citation
Archives Of General Psychiatry, 2004, v. 61 n. 10, p. 974-984 How to Cite?
AbstractContext: For more than a century, it has been uncertain whether or not the major diagnostic categories of psychosis - schizophrenia and bipolar disorder - are distinct disease entities with specific genetic causes and neuroanatomical substrates. Objective: To investigate the relationship between genetic risk and structural variation throughout the entire brain in patients and their unaffected relatives sampled from multiply affected families with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Design: Analysis of the association between genetic risk and variation in tissue volume on magnetic resonance images. Setting: Psychiatric research center. Participants: Subjects comprised 25 patients with schizophrenia, 36 of their unaffected first-degree relatives, 37 patients with bipolar 1 disorder who experienced psychotic symptoms during illness exacerbation, and 50 of their unaffected first-degree relatives. Main Outcome Measures: We used computational morphometric techniques to map significant associations between a continuous measure of genetic liability for each subject and variation in gray or white matter volume. Results: Genetic risk for schizophrenia was specifically associated with distributed gray matter volume deficits in the bilateral fronto-striato-thalamic and left lateral temporal regions, whereas genetic risk for bipolar disorder was specifically associated with gray matter deficits only in the right anterior cingulate gyrus and ventral striatum. A generic association between genetic risk for both disorders and white matter volume reduction in the left frontal and temporoparietal regions was consistent with left frontotemporal disconnectivity as a genetically controlled brain structural abnormality common to both psychotic disorders. Conclusions: Genetic risks for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are associated with specific gray matter but generic white matter endophenotypes. Thus, Emil Kraepelin's pivotal distinction was neither wholly right nor wholly wrong: the 2 major psychoses show both distinctive and similar patterns of brain structural abnormality related to variable genetic risk.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175975
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 14.48
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMcdonald, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorBullmore, ETen_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, PCen_US
dc.contributor.authorChitnis, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorWickham, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorBramon, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorMurray, RMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:03:09Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:03:09Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationArchives Of General Psychiatry, 2004, v. 61 n. 10, p. 974-984en_US
dc.identifier.issn0003-990Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175975-
dc.description.abstractContext: For more than a century, it has been uncertain whether or not the major diagnostic categories of psychosis - schizophrenia and bipolar disorder - are distinct disease entities with specific genetic causes and neuroanatomical substrates. Objective: To investigate the relationship between genetic risk and structural variation throughout the entire brain in patients and their unaffected relatives sampled from multiply affected families with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Design: Analysis of the association between genetic risk and variation in tissue volume on magnetic resonance images. Setting: Psychiatric research center. Participants: Subjects comprised 25 patients with schizophrenia, 36 of their unaffected first-degree relatives, 37 patients with bipolar 1 disorder who experienced psychotic symptoms during illness exacerbation, and 50 of their unaffected first-degree relatives. Main Outcome Measures: We used computational morphometric techniques to map significant associations between a continuous measure of genetic liability for each subject and variation in gray or white matter volume. Results: Genetic risk for schizophrenia was specifically associated with distributed gray matter volume deficits in the bilateral fronto-striato-thalamic and left lateral temporal regions, whereas genetic risk for bipolar disorder was specifically associated with gray matter deficits only in the right anterior cingulate gyrus and ventral striatum. A generic association between genetic risk for both disorders and white matter volume reduction in the left frontal and temporoparietal regions was consistent with left frontotemporal disconnectivity as a genetically controlled brain structural abnormality common to both psychotic disorders. Conclusions: Genetic risks for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are associated with specific gray matter but generic white matter endophenotypes. Thus, Emil Kraepelin's pivotal distinction was neither wholly right nor wholly wrong: the 2 major psychoses show both distinctive and similar patterns of brain structural abnormality related to variable genetic risk.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archgenpsychiatry.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of General Psychiatryen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshBipolar Disorder - Diagnosis - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain - Anatomy & Histologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFamily Healthen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFrontal Lobe - Anatomy & Histologyen_US
dc.subject.meshGenetic Predisposition To Disease - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Geneticen_US
dc.subject.meshPhenotypeen_US
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenia - Diagnosis - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshTemporal Lobe - Anatomy & Histologyen_US
dc.titleAssociation of genetic risks for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder with specific and generic brain structural endophenotypesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, PC: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, PC=rp00459en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1001/archpsyc.61.10.974en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15466670-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-5044225424en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-5044225424&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume61en_US
dc.identifier.issue10en_US
dc.identifier.spage974en_US
dc.identifier.epage984en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000224353000002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcDonald, C=8749594800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBullmore, ET=35405771500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, PC=34573429300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChitnis, X=6602314186en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWickham, H=6701762103en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBramon, E=8089378900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMurray, RM=35406239400en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike851111-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats