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Article: The contribution of risk factors to blood pressure heritability estimates in young adults: The east flanders prospective twin study

TitleThe contribution of risk factors to blood pressure heritability estimates in young adults: The east flanders prospective twin study
Authors
Issue Date2004
Citation
Twin Research, 2004, v. 7 n. 3, p. 245-253 How to Cite?
AbstractThe heritability of blood pressure estimated in previous studies may be confounded by the influence of potential blood pressure risk factors. We applied the classical twin design to estimate the contribution of these covariates to blood pressure heritability. The study consisted of 173 dizygotic and 251 monozygotic twin pairs aged 18-34 years, randomly selected from the East Flanders Prospective Twin Survey. In a standardized examination, blood pressure and anthropometry was measured, a questionnaire was completed, and a fasting blood sample was taken. In univariate and bivariate modeling, diastolic and systolic heritability were estimated both unadjusted and adjusted for potential risk factors. Also, covariate interaction was modeled. Bivariate analysis gave heritability estimates of 0.63 (95%CI 0.55-0.59), 0.74 (95%Ch 0.68-0.79), and 0.78 (95%C1: 0.70-0.84) for diastolic, systolic, and cross-trait heritability, respectively. The remaining variances could be attributed to unique environmental influences. These heritability estimates did not change substantially in univariate analyses or after adjustment for risk factors. A sex-limitation model showed that the heritability estimates for women were significantly higher than for men, but the same genetic factors were operating across sexes. Sex and cigarette smoking appeared to be statistically significant interaction terms. The heritability of blood pressure is relatively high in young adults. Potential risk factors of blood pressure do not appear to confound the heritability estimates. However, gene by sex by smoking interaction is indicated.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175947
ISSN
2006 Impact Factor: 1.757
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZeegers, MPAen_US
dc.contributor.authorRijsdijk, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorFagard, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorGielen, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorDe Leeuw, PWen_US
dc.contributor.authorVlietinck, Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:02:48Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:02:48Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationTwin Research, 2004, v. 7 n. 3, p. 245-253en_US
dc.identifier.issn1369-0523en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175947-
dc.description.abstractThe heritability of blood pressure estimated in previous studies may be confounded by the influence of potential blood pressure risk factors. We applied the classical twin design to estimate the contribution of these covariates to blood pressure heritability. The study consisted of 173 dizygotic and 251 monozygotic twin pairs aged 18-34 years, randomly selected from the East Flanders Prospective Twin Survey. In a standardized examination, blood pressure and anthropometry was measured, a questionnaire was completed, and a fasting blood sample was taken. In univariate and bivariate modeling, diastolic and systolic heritability were estimated both unadjusted and adjusted for potential risk factors. Also, covariate interaction was modeled. Bivariate analysis gave heritability estimates of 0.63 (95%CI 0.55-0.59), 0.74 (95%Ch 0.68-0.79), and 0.78 (95%C1: 0.70-0.84) for diastolic, systolic, and cross-trait heritability, respectively. The remaining variances could be attributed to unique environmental influences. These heritability estimates did not change substantially in univariate analyses or after adjustment for risk factors. A sex-limitation model showed that the heritability estimates for women were significantly higher than for men, but the same genetic factors were operating across sexes. Sex and cigarette smoking appeared to be statistically significant interaction terms. The heritability of blood pressure is relatively high in young adults. Potential risk factors of blood pressure do not appear to confound the heritability estimates. However, gene by sex by smoking interaction is indicated.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTwin Researchen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBelgiumen_US
dc.subject.meshBlood Pressure - Genetics - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBody Heighten_US
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_US
dc.subject.meshCholesterol - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGenotypeen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMultivariate Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshPhenotypeen_US
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSmokingen_US
dc.subject.meshTwins, Dizygotic - Genetics - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshTwins, Monozygotic - Genetics - Physiologyen_US
dc.titleThe contribution of risk factors to blood pressure heritability estimates in young adults: The east flanders prospective twin studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, P: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, P=rp00459en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1375/136905204774200523en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15193169-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-3142766002en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-3142766002&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume7en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage245en_US
dc.identifier.epage253en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZeegers, MPA=7003691618en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRijsdijk, F=6701830835en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, P=34573429300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFagard, R=7201701055en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGielen, M=9737867600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDe Leeuw, PW=35376243500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVlietinck, R=7005040487en_US

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