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Article: No evidence for links between autism, MMR and measles virus

TitleNo evidence for links between autism, MMR and measles virus
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSM
Citation
Psychological Medicine, 2004, v. 34 n. 3, p. 543-553 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. We examined whether, in the UK, there is an increased risk of autism (AD) following exposures, in early life, to: (1) wild measles; (2) live attenuated measles, alone or in combination as MMR; and (3) the alteration of the mumps strain within MMR. Method. We conducted time trend analyses of 2407 AD subjects born between 1959-93; and for comparison, 4640 Down's syndrome (DS) subjects born between 1966-93. Between 1968-86, we correlated variations in AD and DS births with wild measles incidence. Between 1959-93, we tested for abrupt changes in the long-term AD birth trend for the effects of introducing: (1) monovalent measles vaccines in 1968; (2) MMR immunization in 1988; and (3) the 'overnight switch' from mixed use of Urabe MMR to exclusive use of Jeryl-Lynn MMR in 1992. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were used as measures of association. Results. We found no significant association between AD births and exposure (prenatal and postnatal up to 18 months age) to population rates of measles infections, and no 'step-up' increase in AD births associated with the introduction of monovalent measles and MMR vaccines, and changing mumps strain. An unexpected reduction in AD births of 21% (95% CI 6.9-33.3%; P = 0.005) among the post-1987 birth cohorts was detected. Conclusion. No increased risk of AD following exposures to wild measles and vaccinations with monovalent measles, and Urabe or Jeryl-Lynn variants of MMR was detected. The precise meaning of the detected AD births reduction is unclear. Our study cannot exclude rare complications of MMR, given its correlational design. © 2004 Cambridge University Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175936
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.491
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.843
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorLandau, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorFombonne, Een_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:02:39Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:02:39Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsychological Medicine, 2004, v. 34 n. 3, p. 543-553en_US
dc.identifier.issn0033-2917en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175936-
dc.description.abstractBackground. We examined whether, in the UK, there is an increased risk of autism (AD) following exposures, in early life, to: (1) wild measles; (2) live attenuated measles, alone or in combination as MMR; and (3) the alteration of the mumps strain within MMR. Method. We conducted time trend analyses of 2407 AD subjects born between 1959-93; and for comparison, 4640 Down's syndrome (DS) subjects born between 1966-93. Between 1968-86, we correlated variations in AD and DS births with wild measles incidence. Between 1959-93, we tested for abrupt changes in the long-term AD birth trend for the effects of introducing: (1) monovalent measles vaccines in 1968; (2) MMR immunization in 1988; and (3) the 'overnight switch' from mixed use of Urabe MMR to exclusive use of Jeryl-Lynn MMR in 1992. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were used as measures of association. Results. We found no significant association between AD births and exposure (prenatal and postnatal up to 18 months age) to population rates of measles infections, and no 'step-up' increase in AD births associated with the introduction of monovalent measles and MMR vaccines, and changing mumps strain. An unexpected reduction in AD births of 21% (95% CI 6.9-33.3%; P = 0.005) among the post-1987 birth cohorts was detected. Conclusion. No increased risk of AD following exposures to wild measles and vaccinations with monovalent measles, and Urabe or Jeryl-Lynn variants of MMR was detected. The precise meaning of the detected AD births reduction is unclear. Our study cannot exclude rare complications of MMR, given its correlational design. © 2004 Cambridge University Press.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSMen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAutistic Disorder - Epidemiology - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDisease Notification - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGreat Britain - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshImmunization Programsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMeasles - Complications - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMeasles Vaccine - Administration & Dosage - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshMeasles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine - Administration & Dosage - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.titleNo evidence for links between autism, MMR and measles virusen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, P: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, P=rp00459en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0033291703001259en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15259839-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-2342419981en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-2342419981&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume34en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage543en_US
dc.identifier.epage553en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000221146900017-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, W=35975528400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLandau, S=7101776972en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, P=34573429300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFombonne, E=7004793820en_US

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