File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Sense of hyper-positive self and response to cognitive therapy in bipolar disorder

TitleSense of hyper-positive self and response to cognitive therapy in bipolar disorder
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSM
Citation
Psychological Medicine, 2005, v. 35 n. 1, p. 69-77 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction. Cognitive therapy (CT) for bipolar disorder emphasizes the monitoring and regulation of mood, thoughts and behaviour. The Sense of Hyper-Positive Self Scale (SHPSS) measures the extent to which bipolar patients value themselves and perceive themselves to possess personal attributes (e.g. dynamism, persuasiveness and productiveness) associated with a state of being 'mildly high', which does not reach the severity of clinical hypomania. It is hypothesized that patients who score highly on the SHPSS do not respond well to cognitive therapy. Method. One hundred and three bipolar-I patients were randomized into CT and control groups. The SHPSS was administered at baseline and at a 6-month follow-up. Result. The SHPSS had good test-retest reliability after 6 months. At baseline, the Goal-Attainment Dysfunctional Attitudes contributed significantly to the SHPSS scores after the mood measures were controlled for in a regression analysis. There was a significant interaction between baseline SHPSS scores and group allocation in predicting relapse during therapy. Patients who scored highly on the SHPSS had a significantly increased chance of relapse after controlling for mood scores, levels of social functioning at recruitment, and the previous number of bipolar episodes. Conclusion. Not all patients benefited from CT. For patients with high SHPSS scores, CT was less efficacious. The results also indicate that future studies could evaluate targeting these attributes and dysfunctional beliefs with intensive cognitive behavioural techniques. © 2004 Cambridge University Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175904
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.491
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.843
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorWright, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, Pen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:02:21Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:02:21Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsychological Medicine, 2005, v. 35 n. 1, p. 69-77en_US
dc.identifier.issn0033-2917en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175904-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction. Cognitive therapy (CT) for bipolar disorder emphasizes the monitoring and regulation of mood, thoughts and behaviour. The Sense of Hyper-Positive Self Scale (SHPSS) measures the extent to which bipolar patients value themselves and perceive themselves to possess personal attributes (e.g. dynamism, persuasiveness and productiveness) associated with a state of being 'mildly high', which does not reach the severity of clinical hypomania. It is hypothesized that patients who score highly on the SHPSS do not respond well to cognitive therapy. Method. One hundred and three bipolar-I patients were randomized into CT and control groups. The SHPSS was administered at baseline and at a 6-month follow-up. Result. The SHPSS had good test-retest reliability after 6 months. At baseline, the Goal-Attainment Dysfunctional Attitudes contributed significantly to the SHPSS scores after the mood measures were controlled for in a regression analysis. There was a significant interaction between baseline SHPSS scores and group allocation in predicting relapse during therapy. Patients who scored highly on the SHPSS had a significantly increased chance of relapse after controlling for mood scores, levels of social functioning at recruitment, and the previous number of bipolar episodes. Conclusion. Not all patients benefited from CT. For patients with high SHPSS scores, CT was less efficacious. The results also indicate that future studies could evaluate targeting these attributes and dysfunctional beliefs with intensive cognitive behavioural techniques. © 2004 Cambridge University Press.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSMen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAchievementen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAffecten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAttitude To Healthen_US
dc.subject.meshBipolar Disorder - Diagnosis - Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshCognitive Therapy - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshDiagnostic And Statistical Manual Of Mental Disordersen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshGoalsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLogistic Modelsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshSelf Concepten_US
dc.titleSense of hyper-positive self and response to cognitive therapy in bipolar disorderen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, P: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, P=rp00459en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0033291704002910en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15842030-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-13444309702en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-13444309702&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume35en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage69en_US
dc.identifier.epage77en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000226612000007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, D=7201749639en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWright, K=9738948500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, P=34573429300en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats