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Article: Lower prevalence of pre-morbid neurological illness in African-Caribbean than White psychotic patients in England

TitleLower prevalence of pre-morbid neurological illness in African-Caribbean than White psychotic patients in England
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSM
Citation
Psychological Medicine, 2002, v. 32 n. 7, p. 1285-1291 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. It has been suggested that the increased incidence of psychosis in African-Caribbeans living in England may be due to illnesses in which social stress plays an important aetiological role. If this is the case, the prevalence of factors associated with psychosis that predate illness onset such as obstetric complications, pre-morbid neurological illness and poor childhood social adjustment may be expected to be lower in African-Caribbean than Whites psychotic patients. Method. Details of obstetric complications, pre-morbid neurological illness, and pre-morbid social adjustment were obtained for 337 psychotic patients by patient interview, interviews of mothers and chart review. The proportions of patients with each 'risk factor' in the African-Caribbean (N = 103) and White (N = 184) groups were compared using regression analysis; age, sex, social class, diagnosis and referral status were possible explanatory variables. Results. African-Caribbean patients were less likely to have suffered a pre-morbid neurological disorder than their White counterparts (odds ratio 0.19, 95% CI 0.06-0.61). There was no significant difference in pre-morbid social adjustment or obstetric complications between the two groups, though fewer obstetric complications were reported in the African-Caribbean group (21.5%) than the White group (30.9%). Conclusions. African-Caribbean patients with psychosis have experienced less pre-morbid neurological illness.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175868
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.491
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.843
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMckenzie, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorJones, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorToone, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorMurray, RMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:01:55Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:01:55Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsychological Medicine, 2002, v. 32 n. 7, p. 1285-1291en_US
dc.identifier.issn0033-2917en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175868-
dc.description.abstractBackground. It has been suggested that the increased incidence of psychosis in African-Caribbeans living in England may be due to illnesses in which social stress plays an important aetiological role. If this is the case, the prevalence of factors associated with psychosis that predate illness onset such as obstetric complications, pre-morbid neurological illness and poor childhood social adjustment may be expected to be lower in African-Caribbean than Whites psychotic patients. Method. Details of obstetric complications, pre-morbid neurological illness, and pre-morbid social adjustment were obtained for 337 psychotic patients by patient interview, interviews of mothers and chart review. The proportions of patients with each 'risk factor' in the African-Caribbean (N = 103) and White (N = 184) groups were compared using regression analysis; age, sex, social class, diagnosis and referral status were possible explanatory variables. Results. African-Caribbean patients were less likely to have suffered a pre-morbid neurological disorder than their White counterparts (odds ratio 0.19, 95% CI 0.06-0.61). There was no significant difference in pre-morbid social adjustment or obstetric complications between the two groups, though fewer obstetric complications were reported in the African-Caribbean group (21.5%) than the White group (30.9%). Conclusions. African-Caribbean patients with psychosis have experienced less pre-morbid neurological illness.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSMen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAfrican Americans - Psychology - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshAfrican Continental Ancestry Groupen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain Diseases - Ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCaribbean Region - Ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshComorbidityen_US
dc.subject.meshEngland - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEuropean Continental Ancestry Group - Psychology - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen_US
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychotic Disorders - Ethnology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Adjustmenten_US
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.titleLower prevalence of pre-morbid neurological illness in African-Caribbean than White psychotic patients in Englanden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, P: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, P=rp00459en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0033291702006190en_US
dc.identifier.pmid12420897-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036772229en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036772229&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume32en_US
dc.identifier.issue7en_US
dc.identifier.spage1285en_US
dc.identifier.epage1291en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000179027800015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcKenzie, K=7102726928en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJones, P=36078972900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLewis, S=7404041267en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilliams, M=24395495900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridToone, B=7006068925en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, P=34573429300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMurray, RM=35406239400en_US

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