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Article: Prodromes, coping strategies and course of illness in bipolar affective disorder - A naturalistic study

TitleProdromes, coping strategies and course of illness in bipolar affective disorder - A naturalistic study
Authors
Issue Date2001
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSM
Citation
Psychological Medicine, 2001, v. 31 n. 8, p. 1397-1402 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. Psychosocial interventions for bipolar patients often include teaching patients to recognize prodromal symptoms and tackle them early. This prospective study set out to investigate which bipolar prodromal symptoms were reported frequently and reliably over a period of 18 months. Furthermore, we have also investigated which types of coping strategies were related to good outcome. Method. Forty bipolar patients were interviewed for their bipolar prodromal symptoms and their coping strategies at recruitment and 18 months later. Patients were also assessed as to whether they had experienced relapses. Results. Bipolar patients were able to report bipolar prodromal symptoms reliably. Mania prodromal symptoms tended to be behavioural symptoms. A quarter of patients reported difficulties in detecting depression prodromes, which tended to be more diverse and consisted of a mix of behavioural, cognitive and somatic symptoms. Significantly fewer patients who reported the use of behavioural coping strategies to curb excessive behaviour during the mania prodromal stage experienced a manic episode. Similarly, significantly fewer patients who reported the use of behavioural coping strategies experienced depression relapses. How well patients coped with mania prodromes predicted bipolar episodes significantly when the mood levels at baseline were controlled. Ratings of how well subjects coped with mania prodromal symptoms also predicted manic symptoms significantly at T2 when manic symptom at T1 was controlled. Conclusion. Our study suggests that bipolar patients are able to report prodromal symptoms reliably. It is advisable to teach patients to monitor their moods systematically and to promote good coping strategies.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175832
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.491
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.843
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, Pen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:01:40Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:01:40Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsychological Medicine, 2001, v. 31 n. 8, p. 1397-1402en_US
dc.identifier.issn0033-2917en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175832-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Psychosocial interventions for bipolar patients often include teaching patients to recognize prodromal symptoms and tackle them early. This prospective study set out to investigate which bipolar prodromal symptoms were reported frequently and reliably over a period of 18 months. Furthermore, we have also investigated which types of coping strategies were related to good outcome. Method. Forty bipolar patients were interviewed for their bipolar prodromal symptoms and their coping strategies at recruitment and 18 months later. Patients were also assessed as to whether they had experienced relapses. Results. Bipolar patients were able to report bipolar prodromal symptoms reliably. Mania prodromal symptoms tended to be behavioural symptoms. A quarter of patients reported difficulties in detecting depression prodromes, which tended to be more diverse and consisted of a mix of behavioural, cognitive and somatic symptoms. Significantly fewer patients who reported the use of behavioural coping strategies to curb excessive behaviour during the mania prodromal stage experienced a manic episode. Similarly, significantly fewer patients who reported the use of behavioural coping strategies experienced depression relapses. How well patients coped with mania prodromes predicted bipolar episodes significantly when the mood levels at baseline were controlled. Ratings of how well subjects coped with mania prodromal symptoms also predicted manic symptoms significantly at T2 when manic symptom at T1 was controlled. Conclusion. Our study suggests that bipolar patients are able to report prodromal symptoms reliably. It is advisable to teach patients to monitor their moods systematically and to promote good coping strategies.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSMen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Psychologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBipolar Disorder - Diagnosis - Prevention & Control - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPatient Education As Topicen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychological Testsen_US
dc.subject.meshRecurrence - Prevention & Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshReproducibility Of Resultsen_US
dc.subject.meshSeverity Of Illness Indexen_US
dc.titleProdromes, coping strategies and course of illness in bipolar affective disorder - A naturalistic studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, P: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, P=rp00459en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S003329170100472Xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid11722154-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034756415en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034756415&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume31en_US
dc.identifier.issue8en_US
dc.identifier.spage1397en_US
dc.identifier.epage1402en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, D=7201749639en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, G=22036807100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, P=34573429300en_US

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