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Article: Association analysis of polymorphisms in the DRD4 gene and heroin abuse in chinese subjects

TitleAssociation analysis of polymorphisms in the DRD4 gene and heroin abuse in chinese subjects
Authors
Issue Date2000
Citation
American Journal Of Medical Genetics - Neuropsychiatric Genetics, 2000, v. 96 n. 5, p. 616-621 How to Cite?
AbstractHeroin abuse is a major social and public health problem in many parts of the world, yet relatively little is known about its etiology. Although genes play a role in determining susceptibility, they are expected to be of small effect with considerable heterogeneity. Because the dopamine system is involved in reward, its neurotransmitter receptors are candidates for etiological involvement in addiction. In the present study, we examine two polymorphisms in the dopamine D4 receptor, a VNTR in exon III and a point mutation in the promoter (-512C/T) that affects transcriptional efficiency. We examined a sample of 405 heroin-abusing subjects and 304 controls from Sichuan Province, Southwest China. One hundred twenty-one of these cases and 154 controls were previously used in a study of the DRD4 VNTR [Li et al., 1997: Mol Psychiatry 2:413-416], and the remainder are newly ascertained. The two polymorphisms were in weak but detectable linkage disequilibrium (1,418 chromosomes, P < 0.00001, D' = 0.17). When we compared the heroin-abuse group with controls, we found no significant difference between the patients and controls for either polymorphism in the DRD4 gene or their haplotypes. We were also unable to replicate our earlier association between 'long' DRD4 alleles and heroin abuse. However, division of the sample by route of administration (nasal inhalers or injectors) produced a significant difference between inhalers and controls for the DRD4 VNTR (six-fold corrected P = 0.018 by allele) but not for injectors of heroin. The association we observed between inhalers and the DRD4 polymorphism is difficult to interpret, although it is possible that the association is explained by different levels of novelty seeking between the two subgroups. (C) 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175829
ISSN
2003 Impact Factor: -999.999
2009 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.100
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorZhu, ZHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorHu, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, PCen_US
dc.contributor.authorCollier, DAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:01:39Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:01:39Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Medical Genetics - Neuropsychiatric Genetics, 2000, v. 96 n. 5, p. 616-621en_US
dc.identifier.issn0148-7299en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175829-
dc.description.abstractHeroin abuse is a major social and public health problem in many parts of the world, yet relatively little is known about its etiology. Although genes play a role in determining susceptibility, they are expected to be of small effect with considerable heterogeneity. Because the dopamine system is involved in reward, its neurotransmitter receptors are candidates for etiological involvement in addiction. In the present study, we examine two polymorphisms in the dopamine D4 receptor, a VNTR in exon III and a point mutation in the promoter (-512C/T) that affects transcriptional efficiency. We examined a sample of 405 heroin-abusing subjects and 304 controls from Sichuan Province, Southwest China. One hundred twenty-one of these cases and 154 controls were previously used in a study of the DRD4 VNTR [Li et al., 1997: Mol Psychiatry 2:413-416], and the remainder are newly ascertained. The two polymorphisms were in weak but detectable linkage disequilibrium (1,418 chromosomes, P < 0.00001, D' = 0.17). When we compared the heroin-abuse group with controls, we found no significant difference between the patients and controls for either polymorphism in the DRD4 gene or their haplotypes. We were also unable to replicate our earlier association between 'long' DRD4 alleles and heroin abuse. However, division of the sample by route of administration (nasal inhalers or injectors) produced a significant difference between inhalers and controls for the DRD4 VNTR (six-fold corrected P = 0.018 by allele) but not for injectors of heroin. The association we observed between inhalers and the DRD4 polymorphism is difficult to interpret, although it is possible that the association is explained by different levels of novelty seeking between the two subgroups. (C) 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Medical Genetics - Neuropsychiatric Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshAdministration, Inhalationen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAllelesen_US
dc.subject.meshChinaen_US
dc.subject.meshDna - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshExonsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGene Frequencyen_US
dc.subject.meshGenotypeen_US
dc.subject.meshHaplotypesen_US
dc.subject.meshHeroin - Administration & Dosageen_US
dc.subject.meshHeroin Dependence - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInjectionsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Geneticen_US
dc.subject.meshPromoter Regions, Geneticen_US
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Dopamine D2 - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Dopamine D4en_US
dc.subject.meshTandem Repeat Sequencesen_US
dc.titleAssociation analysis of polymorphisms in the DRD4 gene and heroin abuse in chinese subjectsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, PC: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, PC=rp00459en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/1096-8628(20001009)96:5<616::AID-AJMG6>3.0.CO;2-7en_US
dc.identifier.pmid11054768-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034626374en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034626374&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume96en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage616en_US
dc.identifier.epage621en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000089677400006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, T=36072008200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhu, ZH=7404803102en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, X=7409286408en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHu, X=7404709241en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhao, J=7410311266en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, PC=34573429300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCollier, DA=26642980600en_US

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