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Article: Cognitive therapy for bipolar illness - A pilot study of relapse prevention

TitleCognitive therapy for bipolar illness - A pilot study of relapse prevention
Authors
KeywordsBipolar
Cognitive Therapy
Prodrome
Issue Date2000
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0147-5916
Citation
Cognitive Therapy And Research, 2000, v. 24 n. 5, p. 503-520 How to Cite?
AbstractTwenty-five (25) bipolar patients taking mood stabilizers and yet still relapsing were recruited into a randomized controlled pilot cognitive therapy study. All subjects were taking mood stabilizers on recruitment. The control group had treatment as usual - that is, the usual outpatients and multidisciplinary team input. The therapy group received between 12 and 20 sessions of cognitive therapy adapted for bipolar illness in addition to treatment as usual. Therapy consisted of a relapse prevention approach and lasted 6 months. Independent assessments showed that the therapy group had significantly fewer bipolar episodes, higher social functioning, and better coping strategies for bipolar prodromes. Furthermore, there was evidence of less fluctuation in symptoms of mania and depression, less hopelessness, and better medication compliance from subjects' monthly self reports. There was no evidence that improvement in the therapy group was due to more medication being prescribed. In fact, there were significantly less neuroleptics being prescribed in the therapy group for the 6 months after therapy. A further study with a larger sample size and longer follow-up period is warranted.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175812
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.027
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.161
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, DHen_US
dc.contributor.authorBright, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorJones, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorHayward, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchuck, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorChisholm, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, Pen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:01:30Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:01:30Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.citationCognitive Therapy And Research, 2000, v. 24 n. 5, p. 503-520en_US
dc.identifier.issn0147-5916en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175812-
dc.description.abstractTwenty-five (25) bipolar patients taking mood stabilizers and yet still relapsing were recruited into a randomized controlled pilot cognitive therapy study. All subjects were taking mood stabilizers on recruitment. The control group had treatment as usual - that is, the usual outpatients and multidisciplinary team input. The therapy group received between 12 and 20 sessions of cognitive therapy adapted for bipolar illness in addition to treatment as usual. Therapy consisted of a relapse prevention approach and lasted 6 months. Independent assessments showed that the therapy group had significantly fewer bipolar episodes, higher social functioning, and better coping strategies for bipolar prodromes. Furthermore, there was evidence of less fluctuation in symptoms of mania and depression, less hopelessness, and better medication compliance from subjects' monthly self reports. There was no evidence that improvement in the therapy group was due to more medication being prescribed. In fact, there were significantly less neuroleptics being prescribed in the therapy group for the 6 months after therapy. A further study with a larger sample size and longer follow-up period is warranted.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0147-5916en_US
dc.relation.ispartofCognitive Therapy and Researchen_US
dc.subjectBipolaren_US
dc.subjectCognitive Therapyen_US
dc.subjectProdromeen_US
dc.titleCognitive therapy for bipolar illness - A pilot study of relapse preventionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, P: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, P=rp00459en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1023/A:1005557911051en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033844790en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033844790&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume24en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage503en_US
dc.identifier.epage520en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000088877400002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, DH=7201749639en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBright, J=7101698619en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJones, S=35379604800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHayward, P=7103170498en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchuck, N=7801573681en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChisholm, D=7102851432en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, P=34573429300en_US

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