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Article: Fatigue and psychiatric disorder: Different or the same?

TitleFatigue and psychiatric disorder: Different or the same?
Authors
Issue Date1999
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSM
Citation
Psychological Medicine, 1999, v. 29 n. 4, p. 863-868 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. Fatigue and psychiatric symptoms are common in the community, but their association and outcome are sparsely studied. Method. A total of 1177 patients were recruited from UK primary care on attending their general practitioner. Fatigue and psychiatric disorder was measured at three time points with the 12-item General Health Questionnaire and the 11-item Fatigue Questionnaire. Results. Total scores for fatigue and psychiatric disorder did not differ between the three time points and were closely correlated (r around 0.6). The association between non-co-morbid ('pure') fatigue and developing psychiatric disorder 6 months later was the same as that for being well and subsequent psychiatric disorder. Similarly, having non-co-morbid psychiatric disorder did not predict having fatigue any more than being well 6 months previously. Between 13 and 15% suffered from non-co-morbid fatigue at each time point and 2.5% suffered from fatigue at two time points 6 months apart. Less than 1% of patients suffered from non-co-morbid fatigue at all three time points. Conclusions. The data are consistent with the existence of 'pure' independent fatigue state. However, this state is unstable and the majority (about three-quarters) of patients become well or a case of psychiatric disorder over 6 months. A persistent, independent fatigue state lasting for 6 months can be identified in the primary-care setting, but it is uncommon - of the order of 2.5%. Non-co-morbid (pure) fatigue did not predict subsequent psychiatric disorder.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175799
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.491
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.843
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorVan Der Linden, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorChalder, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorHickie, Ien_US
dc.contributor.authorKoschera, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorWessely, Sen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:01:23Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:01:23Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsychological Medicine, 1999, v. 29 n. 4, p. 863-868en_US
dc.identifier.issn0033-2917en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175799-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Fatigue and psychiatric symptoms are common in the community, but their association and outcome are sparsely studied. Method. A total of 1177 patients were recruited from UK primary care on attending their general practitioner. Fatigue and psychiatric disorder was measured at three time points with the 12-item General Health Questionnaire and the 11-item Fatigue Questionnaire. Results. Total scores for fatigue and psychiatric disorder did not differ between the three time points and were closely correlated (r around 0.6). The association between non-co-morbid ('pure') fatigue and developing psychiatric disorder 6 months later was the same as that for being well and subsequent psychiatric disorder. Similarly, having non-co-morbid psychiatric disorder did not predict having fatigue any more than being well 6 months previously. Between 13 and 15% suffered from non-co-morbid fatigue at each time point and 2.5% suffered from fatigue at two time points 6 months apart. Less than 1% of patients suffered from non-co-morbid fatigue at all three time points. Conclusions. The data are consistent with the existence of 'pure' independent fatigue state. However, this state is unstable and the majority (about three-quarters) of patients become well or a case of psychiatric disorder over 6 months. A persistent, independent fatigue state lasting for 6 months can be identified in the primary-care setting, but it is uncommon - of the order of 2.5%. Non-co-morbid (pure) fatigue did not predict subsequent psychiatric disorder.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSMen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAnxiety Disorders - Diagnosis - Epidemiology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshComorbidityen_US
dc.subject.meshDepressive Disorder - Diagnosis - Epidemiology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEnglanden_US
dc.subject.meshFatigue Syndrome, Chronic - Diagnosis - Epidemiology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPrimary Health Careen_US
dc.titleFatigue and psychiatric disorder: Different or the same?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, P: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, P=rp00459en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0033291799008697en_US
dc.identifier.pmid10473313-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032807872en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032807872&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume29en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage863en_US
dc.identifier.epage868en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000082066200011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVan Der Linden, G=7004227458en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChalder, T=7004042289en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHickie, I=17734678500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKoschera, A=6603114867en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, P=34573429300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWessely, S=7102849907en_US

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