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Article: Obstetric complications and familial morbid risk of psychiatric disorders

TitleObstetric complications and familial morbid risk of psychiatric disorders
Authors
Issue Date1998
Citation
American Journal Of Medical Genetics - Neuropsychiatric Genetics, 1998, v. 81 n. 1, p. 29-36 How to Cite?
AbstractObstetric complications (OCs) have been found to occur in higher frequency in patients with schizophrenia. One explanation for this finding is that the genes that contribute to the schizophrenia phenotype also influence the likelihood to experience OCs. If this were true, morbid risk of psychiatric illness should be higher in the first-degree relatives of both schizophrenic and control probands exposed to OCs, compared to probands not exposed to OCs. We set out to test this hypothesis. Information on OCs, blind to family history of psychiatric disorder, was collected retrospectively through maternal interview in 151 psychotic patients and 100 controls. Family history (FH) in relatives of cases (n = 600) and controls (n = 461) was assessed with the FH-RDC and through personal interviews. Tests for associations between family history and OCs were conducted using Cox proportional hazard regression. In the cases, familial morbid risk of affective disorder was greater in those with a history of OCs (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.9, P = 0.007). Analyses examining individual complications revealed associations between FH of affective disorder and pre-eclampsia (HR = 2.9, P = 0.003) and FH of affective disorder and breech presentation (HR = 2.8, P = 0.02), especially when family history in the relatives was confined to affective illness in the mother (HR pre-eclampsia = 4.4, P = 0.009; HR breech-presentation = 4.2, P = 0.008). In controls, affective illness in the mother was not only associated with breech presentation (HR = 7.0, P = 0.01) and pre-eclampsia (HR = 4.4, P = 0.03) but also with other complications. Familial morbid risk of schizophrenia and related psychoses was not associated with OCs. The positive associations between OCs and familial morbid risk of affective disorder suggest that the factors that contribute to familial aggregation of affective symptoms in psychotic patients also influence the likelihood to experience OCs. Although the proportion of OCs that could be attributed to these factors was very small, part of the relationship between family history of affective disorder and psychosis may be mediated by OCs.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175789
ISSN
2003 Impact Factor: -999.999
2009 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.100
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMarcelis, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorVan Os, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorJones, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorGilvarry, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorCannon, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorMckenzie, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:01:18Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:01:18Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Medical Genetics - Neuropsychiatric Genetics, 1998, v. 81 n. 1, p. 29-36en_US
dc.identifier.issn0148-7299en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175789-
dc.description.abstractObstetric complications (OCs) have been found to occur in higher frequency in patients with schizophrenia. One explanation for this finding is that the genes that contribute to the schizophrenia phenotype also influence the likelihood to experience OCs. If this were true, morbid risk of psychiatric illness should be higher in the first-degree relatives of both schizophrenic and control probands exposed to OCs, compared to probands not exposed to OCs. We set out to test this hypothesis. Information on OCs, blind to family history of psychiatric disorder, was collected retrospectively through maternal interview in 151 psychotic patients and 100 controls. Family history (FH) in relatives of cases (n = 600) and controls (n = 461) was assessed with the FH-RDC and through personal interviews. Tests for associations between family history and OCs were conducted using Cox proportional hazard regression. In the cases, familial morbid risk of affective disorder was greater in those with a history of OCs (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.9, P = 0.007). Analyses examining individual complications revealed associations between FH of affective disorder and pre-eclampsia (HR = 2.9, P = 0.003) and FH of affective disorder and breech presentation (HR = 2.8, P = 0.02), especially when family history in the relatives was confined to affective illness in the mother (HR pre-eclampsia = 4.4, P = 0.009; HR breech-presentation = 4.2, P = 0.008). In controls, affective illness in the mother was not only associated with breech presentation (HR = 7.0, P = 0.01) and pre-eclampsia (HR = 4.4, P = 0.03) but also with other complications. Familial morbid risk of schizophrenia and related psychoses was not associated with OCs. The positive associations between OCs and familial morbid risk of affective disorder suggest that the factors that contribute to familial aggregation of affective symptoms in psychotic patients also influence the likelihood to experience OCs. Although the proportion of OCs that could be attributed to these factors was very small, part of the relationship between family history of affective disorder and psychosis may be mediated by OCs.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Medical Genetics - Neuropsychiatric Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshAge Of Onseten_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGreat Britainen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMaternal Ageen_US
dc.subject.meshMorbidityen_US
dc.subject.meshNetherlandsen_US
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_US
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Complications - Epidemiology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenia - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.titleObstetric complications and familial morbid risk of psychiatric disordersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, P: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, P=rp00459en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/(SICI)1096-8628(19980207)81:1<29::AID-AJMG6>3.0.CO;2-Ien_US
dc.identifier.pmid9514584-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032492111en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032492111&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume81en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage29en_US
dc.identifier.epage36en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000072267000006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMarcelis, M=6603325363en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVan Os, J=7102358027en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, P=34573429300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJones, P=36078972900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGilvarry, C=6701857173en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCannon, M=7202419754en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcKenzie, K=7102726928en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMurray, R=35406239400en_US

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