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Article: Carers' knowledge of dementia, their coping strategies and morbidity

TitleCarers' knowledge of dementia, their coping strategies and morbidity
Authors
Issue Date1997
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/4294
Citation
International Journal Of Geriatric Psychiatry, 1997, v. 12 n. 9, p. 931-936 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective. The main hypothesis was that carers of dementia sufferers who have a higher level of knowledge on the subject of dementia have lower rates of physical and psychological morbidity. We also wanted to examine whether a carer's level of knowledge bears any relation to their attributional style and coping mechanisms. Design. Informal carers, caring for patients who fulfilled the CAMDEX criteria for mild or moderate dementia, were approached to participate in the study. Setting. Old age psychiatry services in the West Midlands and Bristol. Participants. Informal carers, caring for relatives with dementia. Measures. Trained researchers administered the Geriatric Mental State Schedule, the Dementia Knowledge Questionnaire, the Pennebaker Inventory of Limbic Languidness (an inventory of common physical symptoms) and the Carer Stress Scale. Results. More knowledgeable carers experienced significantly lower levels of depression but also higher rates of anxiety. Carers' level of knowledge on the subject of dementia showed no association with their physical health. More knowledgeable carers were more likely to have 'reduced expectations' of their dependants' abilities and make 'positive comparisons'; they were also more likely to feel competent and confident as carergivers. Conclusion. The findings support the main hypothesis when considering carers' rates of depression but not when considering rates of anxiety or physical ill-health.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175772
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.699
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.382
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGraham, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorBallard, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, Pen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:01:11Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:01:11Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Geriatric Psychiatry, 1997, v. 12 n. 9, p. 931-936en_US
dc.identifier.issn0885-6230en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175772-
dc.description.abstractObjective. The main hypothesis was that carers of dementia sufferers who have a higher level of knowledge on the subject of dementia have lower rates of physical and psychological morbidity. We also wanted to examine whether a carer's level of knowledge bears any relation to their attributional style and coping mechanisms. Design. Informal carers, caring for patients who fulfilled the CAMDEX criteria for mild or moderate dementia, were approached to participate in the study. Setting. Old age psychiatry services in the West Midlands and Bristol. Participants. Informal carers, caring for relatives with dementia. Measures. Trained researchers administered the Geriatric Mental State Schedule, the Dementia Knowledge Questionnaire, the Pennebaker Inventory of Limbic Languidness (an inventory of common physical symptoms) and the Carer Stress Scale. Results. More knowledgeable carers experienced significantly lower levels of depression but also higher rates of anxiety. Carers' level of knowledge on the subject of dementia showed no association with their physical health. More knowledgeable carers were more likely to have 'reduced expectations' of their dependants' abilities and make 'positive comparisons'; they were also more likely to feel competent and confident as carergivers. Conclusion. The findings support the main hypothesis when considering carers' rates of depression but not when considering rates of anxiety or physical ill-health.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/4294en_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatryen_US
dc.subject.meshAdaptation, Psychologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAnalysis Of Varianceen_US
dc.subject.meshAnxiety - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCaregivers - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshChi-Square Distributionen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshDementia - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDepression - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practiceen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Statusen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Surveysen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.titleCarers' knowledge of dementia, their coping strategies and morbidityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, P: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, P=rp00459en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/(SICI)1099-1166(199709)12:9<931::AID-GPS666>3.0.CO;2-8en_US
dc.identifier.pmid9309472-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0030955258en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0030955258&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume12en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.identifier.spage931en_US
dc.identifier.epage936en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1997XW04500010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGraham, C=7401505162en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBallard, C=35351371500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, P=34573429300en_US

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