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Article: The influence of life events on the subsequent course of psychotic illness. A prospective follow-up of the Camberwell Collaborative Psychosis Study

TitleThe influence of life events on the subsequent course of psychotic illness. A prospective follow-up of the Camberwell Collaborative Psychosis Study
Authors
Issue Date1994
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSM
Citation
Psychological Medicine, 1994, v. 24 n. 2, p. 503-513 How to Cite?
AbstractFifty-nine psychotic patients with acute onset of illness, who had been interviewed about their experience of stressful life events before the episode, were followed up for an average of 42 months. Thirty patients (51%) had experienced a stressful life event in the 3 months immediately before onset (EV+), 29 had not (EV-). In patients with an RDC diagnosis of affective disorder or unspecified functional psychosis, the presence of stressful life events was associated subsequently with milder symptom severity, less time spent in hospital, more treatment for depressive symptoms and less for psychotic symptoms. In schizophrenia, differences were less apparent, but patients with event associated episodes had less need of anti-psychotic maintenance medication over the follow-up period and tended to have spent more time in complete remission. EV+ schizophrenic subjects also had higher morbid risk for schizophrenia in their first degree relatives, and tended to be female and to have less typical symptoms than EV- schizophrenic patients.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175702
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.491
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.843
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorVan Os, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorFahy, TAen_US
dc.contributor.authorBebbington, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorJones, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilkins, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorGilvarry, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorToone, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:00:36Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:00:36Z-
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsychological Medicine, 1994, v. 24 n. 2, p. 503-513en_US
dc.identifier.issn0033-2917en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175702-
dc.description.abstractFifty-nine psychotic patients with acute onset of illness, who had been interviewed about their experience of stressful life events before the episode, were followed up for an average of 42 months. Thirty patients (51%) had experienced a stressful life event in the 3 months immediately before onset (EV+), 29 had not (EV-). In patients with an RDC diagnosis of affective disorder or unspecified functional psychosis, the presence of stressful life events was associated subsequently with milder symptom severity, less time spent in hospital, more treatment for depressive symptoms and less for psychotic symptoms. In schizophrenia, differences were less apparent, but patients with event associated episodes had less need of anti-psychotic maintenance medication over the follow-up period and tended to have spent more time in complete remission. EV+ schizophrenic subjects also had higher morbid risk for schizophrenia in their first degree relatives, and tended to be female and to have less typical symptoms than EV- schizophrenic patients.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSMen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshEngland - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLife Change Eventsen_US
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPersonality Assessmenten_US
dc.subject.meshPersonality Developmenten_US
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scalesen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychotic Disorders - Epidemiology - Genetics - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRecurrenceen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.titleThe influence of life events on the subsequent course of psychotic illness. A prospective follow-up of the Camberwell Collaborative Psychosis Studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, P: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, P=rp00459en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S003329170002746X-
dc.identifier.pmid8084944-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0028244379en_US
dc.identifier.volume24en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage503en_US
dc.identifier.epage513en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1994NQ05300021-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVan Os, J=7102358027en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFahy, TA=8077630100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBebbington, P=7102209922en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJones, P=36078972900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilkins, S=7102345206en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, P=34573429300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRussell, A=35556811900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGilvarry, K=6508391739en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLewis, S=7404041267en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridToone, B=7006068925en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMurray, R=35406239400en_US

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