File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: The relationship of schizophrenic births to 16 infectious diseases

TitleThe relationship of schizophrenic births to 16 infectious diseases
Authors
Issue Date1994
PublisherRoyal College of Psychiatrists. The Journal's web site is located at http://bjp.rcpsych.org/
Citation
British Journal Of Psychiatry, 1994, v. 165 SEP., p. 353-356 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. Recently, several investigators have reported an association between influenza epidemics and increased birth rates of 'preschizophrenic' individuals some four to six months later. Here we examine whether maternal exposure to other infectious diseases can also predispose the foetus to later schizophrenia. Method. Two independent sets of dates of birth of first admission schizophrenic patients, born between 1938 and 1965 in England and Wales, were obtained from the Mental Health Enquiry in England and Wales. Data on the number of deaths per month from 16 infectious diseases between 1937 and 1965 in England and Wales were also collected. We used a Poisson regression model to examine the relationship between deaths from infectious diseases and schizophrenic births. Results. In the two separate data sets, increased national deaths from bronchopneumonia preceded, by three and five months respectively, increased numbers of schizophrenic births. We did not find any other significant associations between schizophrenic births and any of the other 15 infectious diseases. Conclusions. The association between deaths from bronchopneumonia and increased schizophrenic births some months later may be a reflection of the fact that bronchopneumonia deaths increase markedly during influenza epidemics.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175694
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 7.06
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.674
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorO'callaghan, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, PCen_US
dc.contributor.authorTakei, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorGlover, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorHare, EHen_US
dc.contributor.authorMurray, RMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:00:33Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:00:33Z-
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Psychiatry, 1994, v. 165 SEP., p. 353-356en_US
dc.identifier.issn0007-1250en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175694-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Recently, several investigators have reported an association between influenza epidemics and increased birth rates of 'preschizophrenic' individuals some four to six months later. Here we examine whether maternal exposure to other infectious diseases can also predispose the foetus to later schizophrenia. Method. Two independent sets of dates of birth of first admission schizophrenic patients, born between 1938 and 1965 in England and Wales, were obtained from the Mental Health Enquiry in England and Wales. Data on the number of deaths per month from 16 infectious diseases between 1937 and 1965 in England and Wales were also collected. We used a Poisson regression model to examine the relationship between deaths from infectious diseases and schizophrenic births. Results. In the two separate data sets, increased national deaths from bronchopneumonia preceded, by three and five months respectively, increased numbers of schizophrenic births. We did not find any other significant associations between schizophrenic births and any of the other 15 infectious diseases. Conclusions. The association between deaths from bronchopneumonia and increased schizophrenic births some months later may be a reflection of the fact that bronchopneumonia deaths increase markedly during influenza epidemics.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoyal College of Psychiatrists. The Journal's web site is located at http://bjp.rcpsych.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Psychiatryen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBronchopneumonia - Complications - Epidemiology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCausalityen_US
dc.subject.meshChickenpox - Complications - Epidemiology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCommunicable Diseases - Complications - Epidemiology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDelirium, Dementia, Amnestic, Cognitive Disorders - Epidemiology - Etiology - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEngland - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGestational Ageen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_US
dc.subject.meshPrenatal Exposure Delayed Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenia - Epidemiology - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenic Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshWales - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.titleThe relationship of schizophrenic births to 16 infectious diseasesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, PC: pcsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySham, PC=rp00459en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1192/bjp.165.3.353-
dc.identifier.pmid7994505-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0028059361en_US
dc.identifier.volume165en_US
dc.identifier.issueSEP.en_US
dc.identifier.spage353en_US
dc.identifier.epage356en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1994PE76800011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridO'Callaghan, E=7005694363en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, PC=34573429300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTakei, N=35874982900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMurray, G=7202037054en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGlover, G=7102248539en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHare, EH=35986087700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMurray, RM=35406239400en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats