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Article: Gallbladder sludge formation after bone marrow transplant: Sonographic observations

TitleGallbladder sludge formation after bone marrow transplant: Sonographic observations
Authors
Issue Date1994
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00261/
Citation
Abdominal Imaging, 1994, v. 19 n. 1, p. 57-60 How to Cite?
AbstractWe prospectively studied 12 patients before and after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with serial sonography to evaluate gallbladder sludge formation. Patients were studied on four separate occasions to assess the gallbladder for sludge and stones: prior to BMT and conditioning chemoradiation, and on days 3, 13, and 28 after BMT. During two of the sonographic studies, gallbladder volume measurements were made before and after administration of cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-OP) and the ejection fraction (EF) was calculated. Medical records were reviewed for symptoms of cholecystitis, narcotic use, and dietary intake. Sludge and/or stones developed in eight of 12 patients (67%), and in four patients sludge was observed by day 3 post-BMT. Ejection fraction was normal (>50%) pre-BMT in six of the eight patients who developed sludge, and in four of these six post-BMT. Furthermore, five of the eight patients developed sludge and/or stones in the absence of fasting and/or narcotic use. We conclude that gallbladder sludge develops frequently and early in BMT patients and may resolve or progress to stone formation. We did not demonstrate a relationship between impaired contractility and the development of sludge and/or stones, nor did we find a strong association between sludge formation and conditions presumed to cause gallbladder stasis, such as narcotic use and fasting. These findings suggest that other factors apart from impaired gallbladder contractility may play a role in the formation of sludge in the BMT patient.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175688
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.189
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.723
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTeefey, SAen_US
dc.contributor.authorHollister, MSen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, SPen_US
dc.contributor.authorJacobson, AFen_US
dc.contributor.authorHigano, CSen_US
dc.contributor.authorBianco, JAen_US
dc.contributor.authorColacurcio, CJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:00:30Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:00:30Z-
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.citationAbdominal Imaging, 1994, v. 19 n. 1, p. 57-60en_US
dc.identifier.issn0942-8925en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175688-
dc.description.abstractWe prospectively studied 12 patients before and after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with serial sonography to evaluate gallbladder sludge formation. Patients were studied on four separate occasions to assess the gallbladder for sludge and stones: prior to BMT and conditioning chemoradiation, and on days 3, 13, and 28 after BMT. During two of the sonographic studies, gallbladder volume measurements were made before and after administration of cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-OP) and the ejection fraction (EF) was calculated. Medical records were reviewed for symptoms of cholecystitis, narcotic use, and dietary intake. Sludge and/or stones developed in eight of 12 patients (67%), and in four patients sludge was observed by day 3 post-BMT. Ejection fraction was normal (>50%) pre-BMT in six of the eight patients who developed sludge, and in four of these six post-BMT. Furthermore, five of the eight patients developed sludge and/or stones in the absence of fasting and/or narcotic use. We conclude that gallbladder sludge develops frequently and early in BMT patients and may resolve or progress to stone formation. We did not demonstrate a relationship between impaired contractility and the development of sludge and/or stones, nor did we find a strong association between sludge formation and conditions presumed to cause gallbladder stasis, such as narcotic use and fasting. These findings suggest that other factors apart from impaired gallbladder contractility may play a role in the formation of sludge in the BMT patient.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00261/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofAbdominal Imagingen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBone Marrow Transplantation - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshCholelithiasis - Etiology - Physiopathology - Ultrasonographyen_US
dc.subject.meshFasting - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGallbladder Diseases - Etiology - Physiopathology - Ultrasonographyen_US
dc.subject.meshGallbladder Emptyingen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshNarcotics - Adverse Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_US
dc.titleGallbladder sludge formation after bone marrow transplant: Sonographic observationsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, SP: sumlee@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, SP=rp01351en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/BF02165864en_US
dc.identifier.pmid8161906-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0027982889en_US
dc.identifier.volume19en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage57en_US
dc.identifier.epage60en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1994MM45100015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTeefey, SA=55398910800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHollister, MS=6602982159en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, SP=7601417497en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJacobson, AF=7403204421en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHigano, CS=7004197066en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBianco, JA=35397676700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridColacurcio, CJ=6506176230en_US

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