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Article: Gall-bladder sludge: Lessons from ceftriaxone

TitleGall-bladder sludge: Lessons from ceftriaxone
Authors
Issue Date1992
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JGH
Citation
Journal Of Gastroenterology And Hepatology, 1992, v. 7 n. 6, p. 618-621 How to Cite?
AbstractCeftriaxone-associated sludge has been a fascinating story. The occurrence is novel and unique. It has produced a model of gall-bladder sludge in humans. This phenomenon has taught us a great deal about biliary lipid and organic anion excretion by the liver, and the physical chemistry of calcium and calcium sensitive anions. It has added further insights into the pathophysiology of gall-bladder sludge formation. It points to a combination of a hepatic effect where the liver secretes a biochemically abnormal bile, and a gall-bladder effect which provides an environment for precipitation, in order for sludge to develop. The precipitated calcium ceftriaxone has prompted us to re-evaluate the imaging criteria for the diagnosis of gall-bladder sludge versus gallstones. Above all, the rapid onset and rapid disappearance of ceftriaxone sludge has mirrored in a compressed, encapsulated form, the natural history of gall-bladder sludge. It has reminded us that, like gallstones, biliary sludge is usually benign and asymptomatic. However just because it is smaller than gallstones does not mean it cannot cause problems. It can disappear or it can become a calcium ceftriaxone gallstone.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175680
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.322
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.190
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKim, YSen_US
dc.contributor.authorKestell, MFen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, SPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:00:27Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:00:27Z-
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Gastroenterology And Hepatology, 1992, v. 7 n. 6, p. 618-621en_US
dc.identifier.issn0815-9319en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175680-
dc.description.abstractCeftriaxone-associated sludge has been a fascinating story. The occurrence is novel and unique. It has produced a model of gall-bladder sludge in humans. This phenomenon has taught us a great deal about biliary lipid and organic anion excretion by the liver, and the physical chemistry of calcium and calcium sensitive anions. It has added further insights into the pathophysiology of gall-bladder sludge formation. It points to a combination of a hepatic effect where the liver secretes a biochemically abnormal bile, and a gall-bladder effect which provides an environment for precipitation, in order for sludge to develop. The precipitated calcium ceftriaxone has prompted us to re-evaluate the imaging criteria for the diagnosis of gall-bladder sludge versus gallstones. Above all, the rapid onset and rapid disappearance of ceftriaxone sludge has mirrored in a compressed, encapsulated form, the natural history of gall-bladder sludge. It has reminded us that, like gallstones, biliary sludge is usually benign and asymptomatic. However just because it is smaller than gallstones does not mean it cannot cause problems. It can disappear or it can become a calcium ceftriaxone gallstone.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JGHen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Gastroenterology and Hepatologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshBile - Drug Effectsen_US
dc.subject.meshCeftriaxone - Adverse Effects - Pharmacokinetics - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCholelithiasis - Chemically Induced - Ultrasonographyen_US
dc.subject.meshGallbladder - Drug Effects - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.titleGall-bladder sludge: Lessons from ceftriaxoneen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, SP: sumlee@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, SP=rp01351en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1440-1746.1992.tb01496.x-
dc.identifier.pmid1486190-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0027080050en_US
dc.identifier.volume7en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage618en_US
dc.identifier.epage621en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1992KG48200013-
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKim, YS=7410212255en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKestell, MF=7801543836en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, SP=7601417497en_US

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