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Article: Gallstone susceptibility to in vitro fragmentation by a 480-nm pulsed dye laser. Correlation with computed tomography characteristics

TitleGallstone susceptibility to in vitro fragmentation by a 480-nm pulsed dye laser. Correlation with computed tomography characteristics
Authors
Issue Date1991
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.investigativeradiology.com/
Citation
Investigative Radiology, 1991, v. 26 n. 9, p. 799-803 How to Cite?
AbstractThe object of this investigation was to determine gallstone susceptibility to laser lithotripsy and to discover whether this susceptibility is related to the computed tomography (CT) appearance of gallstones. Gallstones collected from surgery were scanned by CT and classified as homogeneously dense (>90 Hounsfield units [HU]), homogeneously faint (30-60 HU), or rimmed. Sixty stones were subjected to laser energy at 20, 40, 60, 80, or 100 mJ. Fracture and fragmentation (all particles < 2 mm) were assessed in relation to the energy level setting and number of laser pulses delivered. The authors found that a 480-nm, flashlamp-pumped pulsed dye laser can fragment completely all the types of human gallstones that were tested, although there is significant variability in gallstone susceptibility to laser lithotripsy. This susceptibility varies with CT appearance: dense stones require fewer pulses and lower energies for fracture and fragmentation, compared to faint or rimmed stones. The authors anticipate that CT characterization of gallstones may be a clinically useful screening tool before laser lithotripsy.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175665
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.887
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.862
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLehman, CDen_US
dc.contributor.authorGoldman, MLen_US
dc.contributor.authorBaron, RLen_US
dc.contributor.authorRichardson, MLen_US
dc.contributor.authorStarr Iii, FEen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, SPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T09:00:21Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T09:00:21Z-
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.identifier.citationInvestigative Radiology, 1991, v. 26 n. 9, p. 799-803en_US
dc.identifier.issn0020-9996en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175665-
dc.description.abstractThe object of this investigation was to determine gallstone susceptibility to laser lithotripsy and to discover whether this susceptibility is related to the computed tomography (CT) appearance of gallstones. Gallstones collected from surgery were scanned by CT and classified as homogeneously dense (>90 Hounsfield units [HU]), homogeneously faint (30-60 HU), or rimmed. Sixty stones were subjected to laser energy at 20, 40, 60, 80, or 100 mJ. Fracture and fragmentation (all particles < 2 mm) were assessed in relation to the energy level setting and number of laser pulses delivered. The authors found that a 480-nm, flashlamp-pumped pulsed dye laser can fragment completely all the types of human gallstones that were tested, although there is significant variability in gallstone susceptibility to laser lithotripsy. This susceptibility varies with CT appearance: dense stones require fewer pulses and lower energies for fracture and fragmentation, compared to faint or rimmed stones. The authors anticipate that CT characterization of gallstones may be a clinically useful screening tool before laser lithotripsy.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.investigativeradiology.com/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofInvestigative Radiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCholelithiasis - Radiography - Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLaser Therapyen_US
dc.subject.meshLithotripsyen_US
dc.subject.meshLithotripsy, Laseren_US
dc.subject.meshTomography, X-Ray Computeden_US
dc.titleGallstone susceptibility to in vitro fragmentation by a 480-nm pulsed dye laser. Correlation with computed tomography characteristicsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, SP: sumlee@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, SP=rp01351en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/00004424-199109000-00004-
dc.identifier.pmid1682289-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0026047643en_US
dc.identifier.volume26en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.identifier.spage799en_US
dc.identifier.epage803en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1991GD08900004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLehman, CD=34570699800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGoldman, ML=7403009387en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBaron, RL=7202712878en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRichardson, ML=7401977058en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStarr III, FE=8956303800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, SP=7601417497en_US

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