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Article: A Distributed Perspective on Instructional Leadership in International Baccalaureate (IB) Schools

TitleA Distributed Perspective on Instructional Leadership in International Baccalaureate (IB) Schools
Authors
KeywordsCurriculum Implementation
Distributed Leadership
Ib Schools
Instructional Leadership
Program Transition
Issue Date2012
PublisherCorwin Press, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=107
Citation
Educational Administration Quarterly, 2012, v. 48 n. 4, p. 664-698 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: The purpose of this study is to provide a better understanding of how instructional leadership responsibilities are distributed in International Baccalaureate (IB) schools in East Asia. Research Design: Case studies were conducted in five international schools located in Thailand, Vietnam, Hong Kong, and China. These schools were selected on the basis of location in East Asia, the offering of the full continuum of the IB's three programs, and evidence of prior academic success. In total, 68 teachers and administrators and 25 students were interviewed. Qualitative analysis of the interview data was conducted using pattern coding. Findings: Three broad instructional leadership practices were identified: curriculum articulation, cross-program activities, and strategic staffing. These appeared to enhance curriculum consistency and coherence across the three IB programs, a problem that had been identified in full-continuum IB schools. The qualitative data suggested that distributed instructional leadership forged and sustained professional interactions among staff across programs and organizational units. Conclusions: IB schools globally are often structurally separated into two or three organizational units (e.g., primary, middle, high school). These units operate IB programs that, despite their common origin and international philosophy, employ distinct pedagogical and curricular approaches. The findings reinforce the importance of acting intentionally to distribute responsibilities for instructional leadership widely throughout the school. They also support the assertion that international schools offer a unique and fruitful context for studying distributed instructional leadership. © The University Council for Educational Administration 2012.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175539
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.118
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.945
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorHallinger, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Aen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:59:06Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:59:06Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationEducational Administration Quarterly, 2012, v. 48 n. 4, p. 664-698en_US
dc.identifier.issn0013-161Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175539-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study is to provide a better understanding of how instructional leadership responsibilities are distributed in International Baccalaureate (IB) schools in East Asia. Research Design: Case studies were conducted in five international schools located in Thailand, Vietnam, Hong Kong, and China. These schools were selected on the basis of location in East Asia, the offering of the full continuum of the IB's three programs, and evidence of prior academic success. In total, 68 teachers and administrators and 25 students were interviewed. Qualitative analysis of the interview data was conducted using pattern coding. Findings: Three broad instructional leadership practices were identified: curriculum articulation, cross-program activities, and strategic staffing. These appeared to enhance curriculum consistency and coherence across the three IB programs, a problem that had been identified in full-continuum IB schools. The qualitative data suggested that distributed instructional leadership forged and sustained professional interactions among staff across programs and organizational units. Conclusions: IB schools globally are often structurally separated into two or three organizational units (e.g., primary, middle, high school). These units operate IB programs that, despite their common origin and international philosophy, employ distinct pedagogical and curricular approaches. The findings reinforce the importance of acting intentionally to distribute responsibilities for instructional leadership widely throughout the school. They also support the assertion that international schools offer a unique and fruitful context for studying distributed instructional leadership. © The University Council for Educational Administration 2012.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCorwin Press, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=107en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEducational Administration Quarterlyen_US
dc.subjectCurriculum Implementationen_US
dc.subjectDistributed Leadershipen_US
dc.subjectIb Schoolsen_US
dc.subjectInstructional Leadershipen_US
dc.subjectProgram Transitionen_US
dc.titleA Distributed Perspective on Instructional Leadership in International Baccalaureate (IB) Schoolsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, M: moosung1@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, M=rp01634en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0013161X11436271en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84865152554en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros217601-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84865152554&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume48en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage664en_US
dc.identifier.epage698en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1552-3519-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000308326300003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, M=36544220200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHallinger, P=6506651654en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWalker, A=7403911246en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike11188950-

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