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Article: Music education in China: In search of social harmony and Chinese nationalism

TitleMusic education in China: In search of social harmony and Chinese nationalism
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=BME
Citation
British Journal Of Music Education, 2011, v. 28 n. 3, p. 371-388 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article critically examines how interactions between social changes, social harmony, and historical memory shape school music education in China. As a historical review and documentary analysis, it traces the historical development of music education and examines the Chinese government's role in such interactions over time. The article argues that the Chinese government uses music and music education as an influential nation-building system to enrich the politics of memory. In particular, it adapts the nation's past for political ends, and passes on state-prescribed values to its citizens with a view to legitimising its power. The dynamics and dilemmas that challenge school education result from two divergent aims: (1) to combine the functional education of Confucianism and nationalism so as to encourage social harmony and maintain national myths; and (2) to encourage popular and other world music with traditional Chinese music by using multicultural teaching strategies in music lessons. The question remains how to balance ideas of social harmony, musical cultures and nationalism in school music education in the contexts of current Chinese education policies, teacher education and the globally oriented economics of China today. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175508
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.184
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.391
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLaw, WWen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, WCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:59:00Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:59:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Music Education, 2011, v. 28 n. 3, p. 371-388en_US
dc.identifier.issn0265-0517en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175508-
dc.description.abstractThis article critically examines how interactions between social changes, social harmony, and historical memory shape school music education in China. As a historical review and documentary analysis, it traces the historical development of music education and examines the Chinese government's role in such interactions over time. The article argues that the Chinese government uses music and music education as an influential nation-building system to enrich the politics of memory. In particular, it adapts the nation's past for political ends, and passes on state-prescribed values to its citizens with a view to legitimising its power. The dynamics and dilemmas that challenge school education result from two divergent aims: (1) to combine the functional education of Confucianism and nationalism so as to encourage social harmony and maintain national myths; and (2) to encourage popular and other world music with traditional Chinese music by using multicultural teaching strategies in music lessons. The question remains how to balance ideas of social harmony, musical cultures and nationalism in school music education in the contexts of current Chinese education policies, teacher education and the globally oriented economics of China today. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=BMEen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Music Educationen_US
dc.rightsBritish Journal of Music Education. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleMusic education in China: In search of social harmony and Chinese nationalismen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLaw, WW: wwlaw@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLaw, WW=rp00921en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0265051711000258en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84855581553en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros201133-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84855581553&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume28en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage371en_US
dc.identifier.epage388en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000297025200009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaw, WW=7103147827en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, WC=7402969084en_US

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