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Article: Resource asymmetries and cumulative advantages: Canadian and US research universities and the field of global health

TitleResource asymmetries and cumulative advantages: Canadian and US research universities and the field of global health
Authors
KeywordsAcademic Organization
Emerging Fields
Global Health
Interdisciplinary Programs
Issue Date2010
PublisherSpringer Netherlands. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0018-1560
Citation
Higher Education, 2010, v. 59 n. 3, p. 367-385 How to Cite?
AbstractGlobal health is becoming an important area of inquiry and learning in North American research universities, stemming from on-going and new commitments to the field by multiple governmental and non-governmental agents. External demands for research and education in global health require enhanced inter-disciplinary, inter-sectoral and international collaborations, all perceived as growing trends but often not easily accommodated in universities. This paper investigates how four leading universities in Canada and the US have entered the field of global health, exploring the relationships among national contexts, academic structures, and institutional strategies. Content analysis of institutional records is triangulated with data from sixty interviews with academic leaders and researchers at Harvard, Johns Hopkins, McGill and Toronto. Resource asymmetries emerge as an important differentiating factor shaping the emergence of global health in the American and Canadian institutions. Domestic sources of support and previous academic structures provided important cumulative advantages to the US campuses in claiming national and international leadership in the field. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175475
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.207
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.717
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOleksiyenko, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorSá, CMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:58:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:58:53Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationHigher Education, 2010, v. 59 n. 3, p. 367-385en_US
dc.identifier.issn0018-1560en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175475-
dc.description.abstractGlobal health is becoming an important area of inquiry and learning in North American research universities, stemming from on-going and new commitments to the field by multiple governmental and non-governmental agents. External demands for research and education in global health require enhanced inter-disciplinary, inter-sectoral and international collaborations, all perceived as growing trends but often not easily accommodated in universities. This paper investigates how four leading universities in Canada and the US have entered the field of global health, exploring the relationships among national contexts, academic structures, and institutional strategies. Content analysis of institutional records is triangulated with data from sixty interviews with academic leaders and researchers at Harvard, Johns Hopkins, McGill and Toronto. Resource asymmetries emerge as an important differentiating factor shaping the emergence of global health in the American and Canadian institutions. Domestic sources of support and previous academic structures provided important cumulative advantages to the US campuses in claiming national and international leadership in the field. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Netherlands. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0018-1560en_US
dc.relation.ispartofHigher Educationen_US
dc.subjectAcademic Organizationen_US
dc.subjectEmerging Fieldsen_US
dc.subjectGlobal Healthen_US
dc.subjectInterdisciplinary Programsen_US
dc.titleResource asymmetries and cumulative advantages: Canadian and US research universities and the field of global healthen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailOleksiyenko, A: paoleks@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityOleksiyenko, A=rp00945en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10734-009-9254-5en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77951205724en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros173145-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77951205724&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume59en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage367en_US
dc.identifier.epage385en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1573-174X-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000274037600008-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOleksiyenko, A=26659171300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSá, CM=23480416900en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike5121686-

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