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Article: Field-dependence/independence: cognitive style or perceptual ability? - Validating against thinking styles and academic achievement

TitleField-dependence/independence: cognitive style or perceptual ability? - Validating against thinking styles and academic achievement
Authors
KeywordsCognitive Style
Field-Dependence/Independence
Perceptual Ability
Thinking Styles
Issue Date2004
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/paid
Citation
Personality and Individual Differences, 2004, v. 37 n. 6, p. 1295-1311 How to Cite?
AbstractIn individual differences psychology, one of the long-standing debated issues has been focusing on the nature of the field-dependence/independence construct as defined in Witkin's theory of psychological differentiation--the pioneer work in the study of intellectual styles. The present study examines the nature of the field-dependence/independence construct against academic achievement as well as against the thinking style construct as defined in Sternberg's theory of mental self-government. Participants were 200 (154 female and 46 male) students enrolled in a large comprehensive university in Shanghai, the People's Republic of China. Participants responded to the Group Embedded Figures Test and the Thinking Styles Inventory. Students' academic achievements were also examined in relation to their field-dependence/independence (FDI) and thinking style scores. Major findings are (1) the FDI and the thinking style constructs were unrelated; and (2) whereas particular thinking styles were related to the students' overall achievement in mathematics courses and courses in the Chinese language, the FDI scores were related only to students' achievement in geometry. It was concluded that the field-dependence/independence construct represents perceptual ability, but not a broad cognitive style. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175444
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.946
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.160
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, LFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:58:46Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:58:46Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationPersonality and Individual Differences, 2004, v. 37 n. 6, p. 1295-1311en_US
dc.identifier.issn0191-8869en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175444-
dc.description.abstractIn individual differences psychology, one of the long-standing debated issues has been focusing on the nature of the field-dependence/independence construct as defined in Witkin's theory of psychological differentiation--the pioneer work in the study of intellectual styles. The present study examines the nature of the field-dependence/independence construct against academic achievement as well as against the thinking style construct as defined in Sternberg's theory of mental self-government. Participants were 200 (154 female and 46 male) students enrolled in a large comprehensive university in Shanghai, the People's Republic of China. Participants responded to the Group Embedded Figures Test and the Thinking Styles Inventory. Students' academic achievements were also examined in relation to their field-dependence/independence (FDI) and thinking style scores. Major findings are (1) the FDI and the thinking style constructs were unrelated; and (2) whereas particular thinking styles were related to the students' overall achievement in mathematics courses and courses in the Chinese language, the FDI scores were related only to students' achievement in geometry. It was concluded that the field-dependence/independence construct represents perceptual ability, but not a broad cognitive style. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/paiden_US
dc.relation.ispartofPersonality and Individual Differencesen_US
dc.subjectCognitive Styleen_US
dc.subjectField-Dependence/Independenceen_US
dc.subjectPerceptual Abilityen_US
dc.subjectThinking Stylesen_US
dc.titleField-dependence/independence: cognitive style or perceptual ability? - Validating against thinking styles and academic achievementen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailZhang, LF: lfzhang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, LF=rp00988en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.paid.2003.12.015en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-4544255663en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros102126-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-4544255663&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume37en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage1295en_US
dc.identifier.epage1311en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000224366300017-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, LF=15039838600en_US
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 140625-

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