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Article: Negotiating knowledge contribution to multiple discourse communities: A doctoral student of computer science writing for publication

TitleNegotiating knowledge contribution to multiple discourse communities: A doctoral student of computer science writing for publication
Authors
KeywordsComputer Science Research Articles
Discourse Communities
Knowledge Contribution
Novice Scholar
Writing For Publication
Issue Date2006
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jslw
Citation
Journal Of Second Language Writing, 2006, v. 15 n. 3, p. 159-178 How to Cite?
AbstractDespite the rich literature on disciplinary knowledge construction and multilingual scholars' academic literacy practices, little is known about how novice scholars are engaged in knowledge construction in negotiation with various target discourse communities. In this case study, with a focused analysis of a Chinese computer science doctoral student's alternate forms of one paper, i.e., its Chinese version aimed at publication by her target domestic journals and its English version aimed at acceptance by an overseas-based international conference, I report the strategies and problems of the student in negotiation of knowledge contribution in three layers of discourse communities: her disciplinary community of artificial intelligence (AI), the domestic discourse community as represented by her target domestic journals, and the international discourse community as represented by her target international conference. I point out that the student's practices of negotiation with her target communities were closely related to her novice status. In terms of pedagogical recommendations to assist novice scholars' efforts in knowledge contribution, apart from pointing to the need for particular textual-level assistance, this study highlights the importance of incorporating into the EAP classroom consciousness-raising with regard to the epistemological characteristics of particular disciplines, as well as helping students to develop a critical positioning on the conventions of alternate discourse communities in their effort to contribute to disciplinary knowledge. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175417
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.744
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.755
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Yen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:58:41Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:58:41Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Second Language Writing, 2006, v. 15 n. 3, p. 159-178en_US
dc.identifier.issn1060-3743en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175417-
dc.description.abstractDespite the rich literature on disciplinary knowledge construction and multilingual scholars' academic literacy practices, little is known about how novice scholars are engaged in knowledge construction in negotiation with various target discourse communities. In this case study, with a focused analysis of a Chinese computer science doctoral student's alternate forms of one paper, i.e., its Chinese version aimed at publication by her target domestic journals and its English version aimed at acceptance by an overseas-based international conference, I report the strategies and problems of the student in negotiation of knowledge contribution in three layers of discourse communities: her disciplinary community of artificial intelligence (AI), the domestic discourse community as represented by her target domestic journals, and the international discourse community as represented by her target international conference. I point out that the student's practices of negotiation with her target communities were closely related to her novice status. In terms of pedagogical recommendations to assist novice scholars' efforts in knowledge contribution, apart from pointing to the need for particular textual-level assistance, this study highlights the importance of incorporating into the EAP classroom consciousness-raising with regard to the epistemological characteristics of particular disciplines, as well as helping students to develop a critical positioning on the conventions of alternate discourse communities in their effort to contribute to disciplinary knowledge. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jslwen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Second Language Writingen_US
dc.subjectComputer Science Research Articlesen_US
dc.subjectDiscourse Communitiesen_US
dc.subjectKnowledge Contributionen_US
dc.subjectNovice Scholaren_US
dc.subjectWriting For Publicationen_US
dc.titleNegotiating knowledge contribution to multiple discourse communities: A doctoral student of computer science writing for publicationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, Y: yongyan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLi, Y=rp00927en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jslw.2006.07.001en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33845267968en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33845267968&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume15en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage159en_US
dc.identifier.epage178en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000243395200001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, Y=12238864000en_US

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