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Article: Do thinking styles matter in the use of and attitudes toward computing and information technology among Hong Kong university students?

TitleDo thinking styles matter in the use of and attitudes toward computing and information technology among Hong Kong university students?
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherBaywood Publishing Co., Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.baywood.com/journals/previewjournals.asp?id=0735-6331
Citation
Journal Of Educational Computing Research, 2003, v. 29 n. 4, p. 471-493 How to Cite?
AbstractIn the present study, the thinking styles as defined in Sternberg's theory of mental self-government are tested against yet another domain relevant to student learning. This domain is students' knowledge and use of as well as their attitudes toward the use of computing and information technology (CIT) in education. One hundred and ninety-three (75 male and 118 female) students from the University of Hong Kong responded to the Thinking Styles Inventory and to a short questionnaire assessing their attitudes toward the use of CIT in education. The participants also indicated their knowledge and use of a comprehensive list of computing and information technology operations as well as their willingness to receive further training in CIT. Results indicated that, after age and gender being controlled for, the more creativity-generating thinking styles and a preference for working with others (as opposed to a preference for working alone) statistically predicted more knowledge and more frequent use of CIT. Moreover, a favorable attitude toward the use of CIT in education was identified among students of all thinking styles but of the local thinking style. Implications of these findings are discussed in relation to teachers and computing/IT programmers as well as to staff development programs among university teachers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175401
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.644
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.550
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, LFen_US
dc.contributor.authorHe, Yen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:58:39Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:58:39Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Educational Computing Research, 2003, v. 29 n. 4, p. 471-493en_US
dc.identifier.issn0735-6331en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175401-
dc.description.abstractIn the present study, the thinking styles as defined in Sternberg's theory of mental self-government are tested against yet another domain relevant to student learning. This domain is students' knowledge and use of as well as their attitudes toward the use of computing and information technology (CIT) in education. One hundred and ninety-three (75 male and 118 female) students from the University of Hong Kong responded to the Thinking Styles Inventory and to a short questionnaire assessing their attitudes toward the use of CIT in education. The participants also indicated their knowledge and use of a comprehensive list of computing and information technology operations as well as their willingness to receive further training in CIT. Results indicated that, after age and gender being controlled for, the more creativity-generating thinking styles and a preference for working with others (as opposed to a preference for working alone) statistically predicted more knowledge and more frequent use of CIT. Moreover, a favorable attitude toward the use of CIT in education was identified among students of all thinking styles but of the local thinking style. Implications of these findings are discussed in relation to teachers and computing/IT programmers as well as to staff development programs among university teachers.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBaywood Publishing Co., Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.baywood.com/journals/previewjournals.asp?id=0735-6331en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Educational Computing Researchen_US
dc.titleDo thinking styles matter in the use of and attitudes toward computing and information technology among Hong Kong university students?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailZhang, LF: lfzhang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, LF=rp00988en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-3042543199en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-3042543199&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume29en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage471en_US
dc.identifier.epage493en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, LF=15039838600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHe, Y=15046844800en_US

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