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Article: Accent and second language listening comprehension

TitleAccent and second language listening comprehension
Authors
Issue Date1997
PublisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journal.aspx?pid=106712
Citation
Relc Journal, 1997, v. 28 n. 1, p. 54-71 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper reviews a series of studies on the effects of accent on second language listening comprehension (L2 LC). It is shown that some of the studies have been misinterpreted as indicating the existence of an own, or local, accent advantage in L2 listening. From the review, it is clear that there is insufficient evidence to support such conclusions. Given previous research findings and current state of knowledge concerning the LC process, it is hypothesised that different but familiar accents should cause no problems for L2 listeners. This hypothesis is tested in an experiment featuring 63 Hong Kong school students. The results support the hypothesis. From the findings, it is argued that degree of familiarity is the crucial issue with regard to whether a particular accent causes LC problems for L2 listeners to English. In contrast, whether or not a speaker's accent is similar to the listener's is a secondary issue, which is important only in so far as it relates to the issue of familiarity.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175387
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.533
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTauroza, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorLuk, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:58:37Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:58:37Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.citationRelc Journal, 1997, v. 28 n. 1, p. 54-71en_US
dc.identifier.issn0033-6882en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175387-
dc.description.abstractThis paper reviews a series of studies on the effects of accent on second language listening comprehension (L2 LC). It is shown that some of the studies have been misinterpreted as indicating the existence of an own, or local, accent advantage in L2 listening. From the review, it is clear that there is insufficient evidence to support such conclusions. Given previous research findings and current state of knowledge concerning the LC process, it is hypothesised that different but familiar accents should cause no problems for L2 listeners. This hypothesis is tested in an experiment featuring 63 Hong Kong school students. The results support the hypothesis. From the findings, it is argued that degree of familiarity is the crucial issue with regard to whether a particular accent causes LC problems for L2 listeners to English. In contrast, whether or not a speaker's accent is similar to the listener's is a secondary issue, which is important only in so far as it relates to the issue of familiarity.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journal.aspx?pid=106712en_US
dc.relation.ispartofRELC Journalen_US
dc.titleAccent and second language listening comprehensionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLuk, J: lukcmj@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLuk, J=rp00931en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/003368829702800104en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-14844313380en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-14844313380&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume28en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage54en_US
dc.identifier.epage71en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTauroza, S=25938962600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuk, J=7006777792en_US

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