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Article: The long-term impact of residential provision for pupils with emotional and behavioural difficulties

TitleThe long-term impact of residential provision for pupils with emotional and behavioural difficulties
Authors
KeywordsEmotional And Behavioural Difficulties
Long-Term Impact
Special Schools
Issue Date2003
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/08856257.asp
Citation
European Journal Of Special Needs Education, 2003, v. 18 n. 3, p. 277-292 How to Cite?
AbstractAs schools, local authorities and governments around the world work towards developing more inclusive policies and practices, arguments about how to provide the most effective education for pupils with emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) continue unabated. The behaviour of these pupils can be extremely challenging to their parents and teachers and there is evidence that mainstream schools are becoming increasingly reluctant to admit them. However, maintaining separate special provision is contrary to the general developments towards inclusion. What, then, are the consequences of placing some of our most disturbed pupils in special schools? Would they have preferred to have been educated in the mainstream sector? How successful are they in obtaining further education and employment? In order to explore these and other related questions, 26 former pupils of a residential school for pupils with emotional and behavioural difficulties were interviewed to see how they were managing since they had left the school. Among the areas we explored were the former pupils' opinions about the quality of education and care they received while they were placed at the school and the impact of the placement on their experiences as young adults. Overall, despite some concerns, the former pupils had very positive memories of their placement at the school and believed that it had helped them to overcome their learning and behavioural difficulties. However, many felt that the support they received after they left the school was inadequate.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175384
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.606
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.581
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFarrell, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorPolat, Fen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:58:36Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:58:36Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal Of Special Needs Education, 2003, v. 18 n. 3, p. 277-292en_US
dc.identifier.issn0885-6257en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175384-
dc.description.abstractAs schools, local authorities and governments around the world work towards developing more inclusive policies and practices, arguments about how to provide the most effective education for pupils with emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) continue unabated. The behaviour of these pupils can be extremely challenging to their parents and teachers and there is evidence that mainstream schools are becoming increasingly reluctant to admit them. However, maintaining separate special provision is contrary to the general developments towards inclusion. What, then, are the consequences of placing some of our most disturbed pupils in special schools? Would they have preferred to have been educated in the mainstream sector? How successful are they in obtaining further education and employment? In order to explore these and other related questions, 26 former pupils of a residential school for pupils with emotional and behavioural difficulties were interviewed to see how they were managing since they had left the school. Among the areas we explored were the former pupils' opinions about the quality of education and care they received while they were placed at the school and the impact of the placement on their experiences as young adults. Overall, despite some concerns, the former pupils had very positive memories of their placement at the school and believed that it had helped them to overcome their learning and behavioural difficulties. However, many felt that the support they received after they left the school was inadequate.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/08856257.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Special Needs Educationen_US
dc.subjectEmotional And Behavioural Difficultiesen_US
dc.subjectLong-Term Impacten_US
dc.subjectSpecial Schoolsen_US
dc.titleThe long-term impact of residential provision for pupils with emotional and behavioural difficultiesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailPolat, F: filiz.polat@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPolat, F=rp00948en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/0885625032000120189en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0142025231en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0142025231&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume18en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage277en_US
dc.identifier.epage292en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFarrell, P=36172450800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPolat, F=7003321828en_US

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