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Article: From training to education. Lifelong learning in China

TitleFrom training to education. Lifelong learning in China
Authors
Issue Date1999
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/03050068.asp
Citation
Comparative Education, 1999, v. 35 n. 2, p. 119-129 How to Cite?
AbstractLifelong learning was nothing unusual in the Chinese tradition. There was no age limit for education in ancient China, although education in those days was mainly for examinations, which were the testing ground for officials. A system of adult education was established in the 1950s, but that was to complement the formal education system as an instrument to implement state manpower planning. Lifelong education as a modern notion was introduced to China only at the end of the 1970s immediately after the Cultural Revolution. The notion did not gain much ground when education was closely associated with state manpower plans, and individuals did not have much room for personal development. The break away from strict manpower planning in the early 1980s has given rise to individual aspirations for education. Such aspirations have integrated with the long tradition of self-motivation in learning and have given rise to spectacular expansion in all kinds of adult education. While the motives for such learning are still very much related to jobs and incomes, alternative objectives for learning are fast developing outside the formal sectors of education. This article analyses the recent development of lifelong education in China, and uses Shanghai, the most developed city, as an illustration.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175380
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.052
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.413
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KMen_US
dc.contributor.authorJin, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorGu, Xen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:58:36Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:58:36Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.citationComparative Education, 1999, v. 35 n. 2, p. 119-129en_US
dc.identifier.issn0305-0068en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175380-
dc.description.abstractLifelong learning was nothing unusual in the Chinese tradition. There was no age limit for education in ancient China, although education in those days was mainly for examinations, which were the testing ground for officials. A system of adult education was established in the 1950s, but that was to complement the formal education system as an instrument to implement state manpower planning. Lifelong education as a modern notion was introduced to China only at the end of the 1970s immediately after the Cultural Revolution. The notion did not gain much ground when education was closely associated with state manpower plans, and individuals did not have much room for personal development. The break away from strict manpower planning in the early 1980s has given rise to individual aspirations for education. Such aspirations have integrated with the long tradition of self-motivation in learning and have given rise to spectacular expansion in all kinds of adult education. While the motives for such learning are still very much related to jobs and incomes, alternative objectives for learning are fast developing outside the formal sectors of education. This article analyses the recent development of lifelong education in China, and uses Shanghai, the most developed city, as an illustration.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/03050068.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofComparative Educationen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleFrom training to education. Lifelong learning in Chinaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheng, KM: kmcheng@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheng, KM=rp00065en_US
dc.description.naturepostprinten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/03050069927928-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0040814753en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros45734-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0040814753&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume35en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage119en_US
dc.identifier.epage129en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKaiMing, C=6507583917en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXinhuo, J=6504285317en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXiaobo, G=6505696543en_US
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 140620-

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