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Article: Stigmatizing attitudes towards individuals with mental illness in Hong Kong: Implications for their recovery

TitleStigmatizing attitudes towards individuals with mental illness in Hong Kong: Implications for their recovery
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/32213
Citation
Journal Of Community Psychology, 2003, v. 31 n. 4, p. 383-396 How to Cite?
AbstractThe literature suggests that stigmatizing attitudes in the community will affect lives and recovery of people with mental illness. This is particularly serious and obvious in Chinese societies where mental illness is often associated with shame and stigma. As Hong Kong and China have undergone rapid changes in terms of social and economic development, this study aimed at providing the most up-to-date empirical information regarding mental illness stigma and its impact on individuals with mental illness. A 31-item Questionnaire on Mental Illness was developed to measure public attitudes towards mental illness, with special reference to issues that affected the burden on family members of mental health consumers. The questionnaire together with the Level of Contact Sub-scale (Holmes et al., 1999) was distributed to primary and secondary students for their friends and relatives aged 16 or above to complete. A total of 1,007 validly completed questionnaires were returned constituting a response rate of 74%. An exploratory factor analysis identified eight factors which accounted for 50.6% of the total variance: hostility, aberrant, openness, resources, acceptance, rights, misgivings, and accommodation. The data showed that there were rather severe stigmatizing attitudes in the community, such as beliefs about parents causing the illness, strong opposition to setting up psychiatric community facilities near their residence, and limited employment opportunities for people with mental illness, which also increased both the subjective and objective burdens on clients' relatives by denying them social and practical support. Correlations between previous contacts and attitudes are significant. Implications to further research and social policy are discussed. © 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175376
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.797
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.425
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTsang, HWHen_US
dc.contributor.authorTam, PKCen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, WMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:58:35Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:58:35Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Community Psychology, 2003, v. 31 n. 4, p. 383-396en_US
dc.identifier.issn0090-4392en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175376-
dc.description.abstractThe literature suggests that stigmatizing attitudes in the community will affect lives and recovery of people with mental illness. This is particularly serious and obvious in Chinese societies where mental illness is often associated with shame and stigma. As Hong Kong and China have undergone rapid changes in terms of social and economic development, this study aimed at providing the most up-to-date empirical information regarding mental illness stigma and its impact on individuals with mental illness. A 31-item Questionnaire on Mental Illness was developed to measure public attitudes towards mental illness, with special reference to issues that affected the burden on family members of mental health consumers. The questionnaire together with the Level of Contact Sub-scale (Holmes et al., 1999) was distributed to primary and secondary students for their friends and relatives aged 16 or above to complete. A total of 1,007 validly completed questionnaires were returned constituting a response rate of 74%. An exploratory factor analysis identified eight factors which accounted for 50.6% of the total variance: hostility, aberrant, openness, resources, acceptance, rights, misgivings, and accommodation. The data showed that there were rather severe stigmatizing attitudes in the community, such as beliefs about parents causing the illness, strong opposition to setting up psychiatric community facilities near their residence, and limited employment opportunities for people with mental illness, which also increased both the subjective and objective burdens on clients' relatives by denying them social and practical support. Correlations between previous contacts and attitudes are significant. Implications to further research and social policy are discussed. © 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/32213en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Community Psychologyen_US
dc.titleStigmatizing attitudes towards individuals with mental illness in Hong Kong: Implications for their recoveryen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, WM: cwming@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, WM=rp00896en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/jcop.10055en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0038237020en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0038237020&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume31en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage383en_US
dc.identifier.epage396en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000183498700006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsang, HWH=7006768493en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTam, PKC=7202539422en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, F=7202586454en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, WM=22984269400en_US

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