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Article: Constructing family climates: Chinese mothers' reports of their co-parenting behaviour and preschoolers' adaptation

TitleConstructing family climates: Chinese mothers' reports of their co-parenting behaviour and preschoolers' adaptation
Authors
Issue Date2000
PublisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journal.aspx?pid=106932
Citation
International Journal of Behavioral Development, 2000, v. 24 n. 1, p. 111-118 How to Cite?
AbstractThis report examines how contemporary middle class urban mothers in Beijing, People's Republic of China (PRC), characterise their own co-parenting conduct in the family. One hundred mothers of 4-year-old preschoolers (95% of whom were only-children) estimated how frequently they engaged in several different activities hypothesised to contribute to co-parenting solidarity. Mothers also reported on their children's academic competence and behavioural adaptation. Self-reported co-parenting activities factored into three major dimensions: behaviours promoting family integrity, co-parental conflict, and frequency of co-parental limit-setting or reprimand activities. Children whose mothers reported more frequent and active efforts to promote family integrity were rated as more academically competent than their peers. Children whose mothers acknowledged more frequent interparental discord and conflict were described both as showing more conduct problems, and as more anxious than their peers. Child conduct problems were also associated with mothers' reports of more regular reprimand activities by the co-parenting partners. These co-parenting variables accounted for significant proportions of the variance in child behaviour measures over and above the contributions of maternal parenting practices. The implications of these findings for studies of co-parental conflict and solidarity within the PRC, and directions for future co-parenting research with Chinese families, are discussed. © 2000 The International Society for the Study of Behavioural Development.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175339
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.61
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.308
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMchale, JPen_US
dc.contributor.authorRao, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorKrasnow, ADen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:58:29Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:58:29Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Behavioral Development, 2000, v. 24 n. 1, p. 111-118en_US
dc.identifier.issn0165-0254en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175339-
dc.description.abstractThis report examines how contemporary middle class urban mothers in Beijing, People's Republic of China (PRC), characterise their own co-parenting conduct in the family. One hundred mothers of 4-year-old preschoolers (95% of whom were only-children) estimated how frequently they engaged in several different activities hypothesised to contribute to co-parenting solidarity. Mothers also reported on their children's academic competence and behavioural adaptation. Self-reported co-parenting activities factored into three major dimensions: behaviours promoting family integrity, co-parental conflict, and frequency of co-parental limit-setting or reprimand activities. Children whose mothers reported more frequent and active efforts to promote family integrity were rated as more academically competent than their peers. Children whose mothers acknowledged more frequent interparental discord and conflict were described both as showing more conduct problems, and as more anxious than their peers. Child conduct problems were also associated with mothers' reports of more regular reprimand activities by the co-parenting partners. These co-parenting variables accounted for significant proportions of the variance in child behaviour measures over and above the contributions of maternal parenting practices. The implications of these findings for studies of co-parental conflict and solidarity within the PRC, and directions for future co-parenting research with Chinese families, are discussed. © 2000 The International Society for the Study of Behavioural Development.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journal.aspx?pid=106932en_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Behavioral Developmenten_US
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Behavioral Development. Copyright © Sage Publications Ltd.-
dc.titleConstructing family climates: Chinese mothers' reports of their co-parenting behaviour and preschoolers' adaptationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailRao, N: nrao@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityRao, N=rp00953en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0001300248en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros53162-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0001300248&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume24en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage111en_US
dc.identifier.epage118en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcHale, JP=7006240470en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRao, N=7401628868en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKrasnow, AD=36788361900en_US
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 140625-

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