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Article: Preliminary Data on Prevention and Treatment of Voice Problems in Student Teachers

TitlePreliminary Data on Prevention and Treatment of Voice Problems in Student Teachers
Authors
KeywordsHygiene
Prevention
Student Teachers
Treatment
Voice Disorders
Voice Problems
Voice Training
Issue Date2012
PublisherMosby, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jvoice
Citation
Journal Of Voice, 2012, v. 26 n. 6, p. 816.e1-816.e12 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives/Hypotheses: To assess the utility of a targeted voice hygiene (VH) program compared to VH plus voice training intervention (VH + VT) for the prevention and treatment of voice problems in student teachers. Study Design: Prospective, randomized. Methods: Thirty-one student teachers with low (good) and high (poor) voice handicap index (VHI) scores in Pittsburgh and Hong Kong were randomly assigned to (1) a targeted, individually tailored VH program, (2) the VH program plus resonant VT (VH + VT), or (c) a control group. Participants assigned to intervention groups were monitored for their adherence to their programs for their first 4 weeks of student teaching. VHI data were collected again 4 weeks postintervention (both sites) and 8 weeks postintervention, following a no-contact washout period (Pittsburgh). Results: Descriptive data analysis indicated that across both sites, for initially healthy participants, the VH program was sufficient to prevent worsening of VHI scores that occurred in all control participants over the first 4-8 weeks of student teaching. The addition of VT did not consistently enhance protective benefits over VH alone. In contrast, for participants with initially poor VHI scores, the VH program failed to produce VHI benefits over the control condition. The addition of VT was required to optimize results for that cohort. Conclusions: Preliminary data suggest that a minimalist, individually tailored VH program may be sufficient to prevent voice problems from teaching in healthy student teachers. However, for student teachers with existing voice problems, VT may be required to optimize results of intervention. © 2012 The Voice Foundation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175333
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.113
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.878
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNanjundeswaran, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, NYKen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, KMKen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, RKSen_US
dc.contributor.authorYiu, EMLen_US
dc.contributor.authorVerdolini-Abbott, Ken_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:58:13Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:58:13Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Voice, 2012, v. 26 n. 6, p. 816.e1-816.e12en_US
dc.identifier.issn0892-1997en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175333-
dc.description.abstractObjectives/Hypotheses: To assess the utility of a targeted voice hygiene (VH) program compared to VH plus voice training intervention (VH + VT) for the prevention and treatment of voice problems in student teachers. Study Design: Prospective, randomized. Methods: Thirty-one student teachers with low (good) and high (poor) voice handicap index (VHI) scores in Pittsburgh and Hong Kong were randomly assigned to (1) a targeted, individually tailored VH program, (2) the VH program plus resonant VT (VH + VT), or (c) a control group. Participants assigned to intervention groups were monitored for their adherence to their programs for their first 4 weeks of student teaching. VHI data were collected again 4 weeks postintervention (both sites) and 8 weeks postintervention, following a no-contact washout period (Pittsburgh). Results: Descriptive data analysis indicated that across both sites, for initially healthy participants, the VH program was sufficient to prevent worsening of VHI scores that occurred in all control participants over the first 4-8 weeks of student teaching. The addition of VT did not consistently enhance protective benefits over VH alone. In contrast, for participants with initially poor VHI scores, the VH program failed to produce VHI benefits over the control condition. The addition of VT was required to optimize results for that cohort. Conclusions: Preliminary data suggest that a minimalist, individually tailored VH program may be sufficient to prevent voice problems from teaching in healthy student teachers. However, for student teachers with existing voice problems, VT may be required to optimize results of intervention. © 2012 The Voice Foundation.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMosby, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jvoiceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Voiceen_US
dc.subjectHygieneen_US
dc.subjectPreventionen_US
dc.subjectStudent Teachersen_US
dc.subjectTreatmenten_US
dc.subjectVoice Disordersen_US
dc.subjectVoice Problemsen_US
dc.subjectVoice Trainingen_US
dc.titlePreliminary Data on Prevention and Treatment of Voice Problems in Student Teachersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, KMK: karencmk@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYiu, EML: eyiu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, KMK=rp00893en_US
dc.identifier.authorityYiu, EML=rp00981en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jvoice.2012.04.008en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22921297-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84870064549en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros219255-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000311428300036-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNanjundeswaran, C=8528885100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, NYK=22034980600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KMK=14065941500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, RKS=55339766200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYiu, EML=7003337895en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVerdoliniAbbott, K=23989468200en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike11164679-

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