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Article: A database for investigating the logographeme as a basic unit of writing Chinese

TitleA database for investigating the logographeme as a basic unit of writing Chinese
Authors
Issue Date2010
Citation
International Journal Of Speech-Language Pathology, 2010, v. 12 n. 1, p. 8-18 How to Cite?
AbstractChinese script is non-alphabetic and a Chinese graph is basically syllabic which may consist of phonetic and semantic radicals with no representation of phonemes. The logographeme, a unit smaller than a radical, has been suggested to be the basic unit of Chinese writing based on data collected on people with aphasia. To better understand the role of logographemes in Chinese writing development, a data corpus of logographemes based on characters appearing in primary school textbooks is established. Logographemes are analysed in terms of features that are believed to influence writing development. A total of 249 logographemes were identified: 151 logographemes with no meaning and sound (NMS), 84 logographemes with both sound and meaning which could also stand alone to serve as a character (SA) and 14 logographemes with meaning only (MO). At each grade, the frequencies of NMS logographemes were relatively lower than those of SA and MO logographemes, and the frequencies of SA and MO logographemes were similar; 94% of logographemes were present in the characters taught to grade one students. Students learnt all the pronounceable logographemes by grade three, while they finished all the logographemes without sound until grade six. Characters with left-right, top-bottom and enclosing configurations constituted about 94% of all single-unit characters acquired in primary school years. Statistics derived from the data corpus regarding these features across grades enable us to make specific predictions about stages of literacy development and suggestions for investigation into processes involved in character production. © 2009 The Speech Pathology Association of Australia Limited.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175311
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.543
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLui, HMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, MTen_US
dc.contributor.authorLaw, SPen_US
dc.contributor.authorFung, RSYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:58:06Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:58:06Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Speech-Language Pathology, 2010, v. 12 n. 1, p. 8-18en_US
dc.identifier.issn1754-9515en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175311-
dc.description.abstractChinese script is non-alphabetic and a Chinese graph is basically syllabic which may consist of phonetic and semantic radicals with no representation of phonemes. The logographeme, a unit smaller than a radical, has been suggested to be the basic unit of Chinese writing based on data collected on people with aphasia. To better understand the role of logographemes in Chinese writing development, a data corpus of logographemes based on characters appearing in primary school textbooks is established. Logographemes are analysed in terms of features that are believed to influence writing development. A total of 249 logographemes were identified: 151 logographemes with no meaning and sound (NMS), 84 logographemes with both sound and meaning which could also stand alone to serve as a character (SA) and 14 logographemes with meaning only (MO). At each grade, the frequencies of NMS logographemes were relatively lower than those of SA and MO logographemes, and the frequencies of SA and MO logographemes were similar; 94% of logographemes were present in the characters taught to grade one students. Students learnt all the pronounceable logographemes by grade three, while they finished all the logographemes without sound until grade six. Characters with left-right, top-bottom and enclosing configurations constituted about 94% of all single-unit characters acquired in primary school years. Statistics derived from the data corpus regarding these features across grades enable us to make specific predictions about stages of literacy development and suggestions for investigation into processes involved in character production. © 2009 The Speech Pathology Association of Australia Limited.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Speech-Language Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAphasiaen_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Groupen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshDatabases As Topic - Standardsen_US
dc.subject.meshEducation - Standardsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLanguageen_US
dc.subject.meshPhoneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshSpeechen_US
dc.subject.meshWriting - Standardsen_US
dc.titleA database for investigating the logographeme as a basic unit of writing Chineseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, MT: mtleung@hkusua.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLaw, SP: splaw@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, MT=rp00925en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLaw, SP=rp00920en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/17549500903203082en_US
dc.identifier.pmid20380245-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-75149122335en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros173608-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-75149122335&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume12en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage8en_US
dc.identifier.epage18en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000275139900002-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLui, HM=35330376000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, MT=7201943346en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaw, SP=7202242088en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFung, RSY=35423689500en_US

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