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Article: Phonological abilities of hearing-impaired Cantonese-speaking children with cochlear implants or hearing aids

TitlePhonological abilities of hearing-impaired Cantonese-speaking children with cochlear implants or hearing aids
Authors
KeywordsCantonese-Speaking Children
Cochlear Implant
Hearing Loss
Phonological Development
Issue Date2006
PublisherAmerican Speech - Language - Hearing Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.asha.org/about/publications/journal-abstracts/jslhr-a/
Citation
Journal Of Speech, Language, And Hearing Research, 2006, v. 49 n. 6, p. 1342-1353 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: This article examined the phonological skills of 2 groups of Cantonesespeaking children with prelingual, profound bilateral hearing loss. The phonological abilities of 7 children fitted with hearing aids were compared with the abilities of 7 children who wore cochlear implants. Method: Participants in each group ranged in age from 5;1 to 6;4 years. The participants were asked to name 57 pictures and retell 2 stories. Phonological abilities were described in terms of the participants' phonological units and the phonological processes used. The participants' perception of single words was assessed using a Cantonese phonology test that includes tonal, segmental, and semantic distracters. Results: All except 1 participant had incomplete phonetic repertories. All participants showed complete vowel and tone inventories. The study group used both developmental rules and nondevelopmental phonological rules. For perception of single words, participants chose the target word most often. The cochlear implant users had a significantly higher percentage correct score for consonant production than hearing aid users. Conclusions: The prediction that Cantonese children wearing cochlear implants would have better phonological skills than children having hearing aids with a similar degree of hearing loss was confirmed. Cochlear implant usage appeared to promote consonant feature production development to a greater degree than did the use of a hearing aid. © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175295
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.526
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.970
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLaw, ZWYen_US
dc.contributor.authorSo, LKHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:58:01Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:58:01Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Speech, Language, And Hearing Research, 2006, v. 49 n. 6, p. 1342-1353en_US
dc.identifier.issn1092-4388en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175295-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This article examined the phonological skills of 2 groups of Cantonesespeaking children with prelingual, profound bilateral hearing loss. The phonological abilities of 7 children fitted with hearing aids were compared with the abilities of 7 children who wore cochlear implants. Method: Participants in each group ranged in age from 5;1 to 6;4 years. The participants were asked to name 57 pictures and retell 2 stories. Phonological abilities were described in terms of the participants' phonological units and the phonological processes used. The participants' perception of single words was assessed using a Cantonese phonology test that includes tonal, segmental, and semantic distracters. Results: All except 1 participant had incomplete phonetic repertories. All participants showed complete vowel and tone inventories. The study group used both developmental rules and nondevelopmental phonological rules. For perception of single words, participants chose the target word most often. The cochlear implant users had a significantly higher percentage correct score for consonant production than hearing aid users. Conclusions: The prediction that Cantonese children wearing cochlear implants would have better phonological skills than children having hearing aids with a similar degree of hearing loss was confirmed. Cochlear implant usage appeared to promote consonant feature production development to a greater degree than did the use of a hearing aid. © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Speech - Language - Hearing Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.asha.org/about/publications/journal-abstracts/jslhr-a/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Researchen_US
dc.subjectCantonese-Speaking Childrenen_US
dc.subjectCochlear Implanten_US
dc.subjectHearing Lossen_US
dc.subjectPhonological Developmenten_US
dc.titlePhonological abilities of hearing-impaired Cantonese-speaking children with cochlear implants or hearing aidsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSo, LKH: lydiaso@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySo, LKH=rp00959en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1044/1092-4388(2006/096)en_US
dc.identifier.pmid17197500-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33847696169en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33847696169&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume49en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage1342en_US
dc.identifier.epage1353en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000243706500013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaw, ZWY=16031077200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSo, LKH=35977878100en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike11032453-

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