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Article: Neonatal hearing screening: Evaluation of tone-burst and click-evoked otoacoustic emission test criteria

TitleNeonatal hearing screening: Evaluation of tone-burst and click-evoked otoacoustic emission test criteria
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ear-hearing.com
Citation
Ear And Hearing, 2006, v. 27 n. 3, p. 256-262 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE: Click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs) are widely used in universal neonatal hearing screening programs. A common finding in many such programs is a relatively high false-positive rate. This is often due to infant physiological noise adversely affecting the emission recording, leading to a "refer" screening outcome. In an attempt to reduce false-positive screening outcomes related to the effects of noise on otoacoustic emission response detection, tone-burst-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TBOAEs) were included in a neonatal hearing screening program because TBOAEs may elicit a greater signal-to-noise ratio than CEOAEs. The research project compared the pass/refer rate for a CEOAE-based test using established pass/refer criteria with the pass/refer rate for screening criteria that were based on TBOAE results alone or on combined CEOAE and TEOAE results. DESIGN: Neonates were recruited at the Hong Kong Adventist Hospital, and both CEOAEs and TBOAEs were performed. Six passing criteria were used in this study, based on CEOAEs only; CEOAEs plus 1 kHz TBOAEs; CEOAEs plus 2 kHz TBOAEs; CEOAEs plus 3 kHz TBOAEs; CEOAEs plus 1, 2, and 3 kHz TBOAEs; and TBOAEs only. RESULTS: Data from 298 neonates (546 ears) were obtained. Criteria set 1, using CEOAEs only, demonstrated a pass rate of 79.1%, and 114 ears were referred. Criteria set 2, using CEOAEs together with TBOAEs recorded at 1 kHz, passed 39 more ears than Protocol 1, and the pass rate was 86.3%. Hence, the overall referral rate for total number of screened ears decreased by 7.2 percentage points. Criteria set 3, using CEOAEs together with TBOAEs recorded at 2 kHz, and Criteria set 4, using CEOAEs in conjunction with TBOAEs recorded at 3 kHz, gave pass rates similar to Criteria set 1. Criteria set 5, using TBOAE information at frequencies where CEOAEs were not rated as "pass," raised the pass rate from 79.1 to 87.6%, reducing the overall referral rate by 8.5 percentage points. Criteria set 6, in which neonates were screened with TBOAEs recorded at 1, 2, and 3 kHz, gave a pass rate of 78.4%, similar to results for the CEOAE-only procedure. CONCLUSIONS: Both Criteria sets 2 and 5, which combined CEOAE and TBOAE recordings, gave significantly higher pass rates than Criteria sets 1, 3, 4, and 6. The results suggest that the introduction of combined CEOAE and TBOAE protocols may assist in the reduction of refer outcomes, and hence the false-positive rates, of neonatal hearing screening programs. Copyright © 2006 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175290
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.517
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.794
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMcpherson, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, SFen_US
dc.contributor.authorShi, BXen_US
dc.contributor.authorTang, JLFen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, BYKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:57:59Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:57:59Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationEar And Hearing, 2006, v. 27 n. 3, p. 256-262en_US
dc.identifier.issn0196-0202en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175290-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs) are widely used in universal neonatal hearing screening programs. A common finding in many such programs is a relatively high false-positive rate. This is often due to infant physiological noise adversely affecting the emission recording, leading to a "refer" screening outcome. In an attempt to reduce false-positive screening outcomes related to the effects of noise on otoacoustic emission response detection, tone-burst-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TBOAEs) were included in a neonatal hearing screening program because TBOAEs may elicit a greater signal-to-noise ratio than CEOAEs. The research project compared the pass/refer rate for a CEOAE-based test using established pass/refer criteria with the pass/refer rate for screening criteria that were based on TBOAE results alone or on combined CEOAE and TEOAE results. DESIGN: Neonates were recruited at the Hong Kong Adventist Hospital, and both CEOAEs and TBOAEs were performed. Six passing criteria were used in this study, based on CEOAEs only; CEOAEs plus 1 kHz TBOAEs; CEOAEs plus 2 kHz TBOAEs; CEOAEs plus 3 kHz TBOAEs; CEOAEs plus 1, 2, and 3 kHz TBOAEs; and TBOAEs only. RESULTS: Data from 298 neonates (546 ears) were obtained. Criteria set 1, using CEOAEs only, demonstrated a pass rate of 79.1%, and 114 ears were referred. Criteria set 2, using CEOAEs together with TBOAEs recorded at 1 kHz, passed 39 more ears than Protocol 1, and the pass rate was 86.3%. Hence, the overall referral rate for total number of screened ears decreased by 7.2 percentage points. Criteria set 3, using CEOAEs together with TBOAEs recorded at 2 kHz, and Criteria set 4, using CEOAEs in conjunction with TBOAEs recorded at 3 kHz, gave pass rates similar to Criteria set 1. Criteria set 5, using TBOAE information at frequencies where CEOAEs were not rated as "pass," raised the pass rate from 79.1 to 87.6%, reducing the overall referral rate by 8.5 percentage points. Criteria set 6, in which neonates were screened with TBOAEs recorded at 1, 2, and 3 kHz, gave a pass rate of 78.4%, similar to results for the CEOAE-only procedure. CONCLUSIONS: Both Criteria sets 2 and 5, which combined CEOAE and TBOAE recordings, gave significantly higher pass rates than Criteria sets 1, 3, 4, and 6. The results suggest that the introduction of combined CEOAE and TBOAE protocols may assist in the reduction of refer outcomes, and hence the false-positive rates, of neonatal hearing screening programs. Copyright © 2006 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ear-hearing.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEar and Hearingen_US
dc.subject.meshFalse Positive Reactionsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHearing Loss - Diagnosisen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshNeonatal Screening - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshOtoacoustic Emissions, Spontaneousen_US
dc.subject.meshReference Standardsen_US
dc.subject.meshReproducibility Of Resultsen_US
dc.titleNeonatal hearing screening: Evaluation of tone-burst and click-evoked otoacoustic emission test criteriaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMcPherson, B: dbmcpher@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMcPherson, B=rp00937en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/01.aud.0000215971.18998.9den_US
dc.identifier.pmid16672794-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33748476295en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33748476295&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume27en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage256en_US
dc.identifier.epage262en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000237441200005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcPherson, B=7006800770en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, SF=14519308300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShi, BX=8435763300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, JLF=37030338000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, BYK=14520237900en_US

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