File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Feasibility of community-based hearing screening using transient evoked otoacoustic emissions

TitleFeasibility of community-based hearing screening using transient evoked otoacoustic emissions
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherWB Saunders Co Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/puhe
Citation
Public Health, 1998, v. 112 n. 3, p. 147-152 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study investigated the feasibility of obtaining transient evoked otoacoustic emissions for hearing screening purposes from infants and children at seven child health clinics. Factors affecting the outcomes of the community hearing screening program were examined. The subject group comprised 2305 children aged two weeks to 11 y 11 mon. Many children were attending the clinics for initial immunisation at two months of age. While there were no exclusion criteria for the 1305 young infants tested who were in this category, all other children were screened only upon receipt of a referral from clinic nurses. Results indicated that 182 children (7.9%) did not complete the screening for both ears within the time constraint (usually 15 min) of a child health clinic visit. Three hundred and sixty-two children (15.7%) failed the first screening. Of the 226 children who returned for a second screening test, separated from the first by at least two weeks, 121 children failed. With parents' consent, 107 children (4.6% of all participants) were referred for diagnostic or medical assessment. Subsequently, 77 out of 94 children who received audiological or medical assessment were found to have some degree of hearing impairment. The majority of positive screening results were associated with middle ear disorder. The results suggest that TEOAE screening has potential as a technique in the community health setting but improvements in instrumentation are required to reduce 'could not test' cases and to separate probable conductive hearing loss from cases likely to have other disorders.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175265
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.566
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.758
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMcpherson, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorKei, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmyth, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorLatham, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorLoscher, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-26T08:57:52Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-26T08:57:52Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.citationPublic Health, 1998, v. 112 n. 3, p. 147-152en_US
dc.identifier.issn0033-3506en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/175265-
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the feasibility of obtaining transient evoked otoacoustic emissions for hearing screening purposes from infants and children at seven child health clinics. Factors affecting the outcomes of the community hearing screening program were examined. The subject group comprised 2305 children aged two weeks to 11 y 11 mon. Many children were attending the clinics for initial immunisation at two months of age. While there were no exclusion criteria for the 1305 young infants tested who were in this category, all other children were screened only upon receipt of a referral from clinic nurses. Results indicated that 182 children (7.9%) did not complete the screening for both ears within the time constraint (usually 15 min) of a child health clinic visit. Three hundred and sixty-two children (15.7%) failed the first screening. Of the 226 children who returned for a second screening test, separated from the first by at least two weeks, 121 children failed. With parents' consent, 107 children (4.6% of all participants) were referred for diagnostic or medical assessment. Subsequently, 77 out of 94 children who received audiological or medical assessment were found to have some degree of hearing impairment. The majority of positive screening results were associated with middle ear disorder. The results suggest that TEOAE screening has potential as a technique in the community health setting but improvements in instrumentation are required to reduce 'could not test' cases and to separate probable conductive hearing loss from cases likely to have other disorders.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWB Saunders Co Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/puheen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPublic Healthen_US
dc.subject.meshAudiometry, Evoked Response - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshChild Health Servicesen_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshCommunity Health Centersen_US
dc.subject.meshDecision Treesen_US
dc.subject.meshFeasibility Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshHearing Disorders - Prevention & Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfanten_US
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_US
dc.subject.meshMass Screening - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshOtoacoustic Emissions, Spontaneousen_US
dc.subject.meshOutcome Assessment (Health Care)en_US
dc.subject.meshReferral And Consultationen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.titleFeasibility of community-based hearing screening using transient evoked otoacoustic emissionsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMcPherson, B: dbmcpher@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMcPherson, B=rp00937en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0033-3506(98)00219-4en_US
dc.identifier.pmid9629020-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031778379en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0031778379&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume112en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage147en_US
dc.identifier.epage152en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcPherson, B=7006800770en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKei, J=7003334206en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSmyth, V=7003542460en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLatham, S=7006689337en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLoscher, J=6603489225en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats